Maggie Penman

Maggie Penman is a reporter and producer for NPR. She got her start in public radio as an intern at WNYC, and has since worked on NPR's flagship show Morning Edition, reported on breaking news for the network, and helped launch the popular social science podcast Hidden Brain.

Her reporting has taken her from the North Dakota Prairie to Berlin, Germany, to a tiny town in Japan called Obama. In 2017, she reported on the German election as an Arthur F. Burns Fellow through the International Center for Journalists.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Updated at 6:36 p.m. ET

Protests in Chicago escalated on Saturday night, becoming a tense clash between demonstrators and police over the fatal shooting of a man on the city's South Side.

On Sunday, police released a 30-second video clip from an officer's body-worn camera showing a black man shot by Chicago police had a gun in a holster at his hip. According to The Associated Press, the man was "running away and reaching toward his waist when he was shot multiple times."

The Trump administration said Saturday that it is temporarily halting billions of dollars of payments designed to help insurers meet the Affordable Care Act requirement that they provide coverage regardless of whether a person is healthy or sick.

Steve Ditko, the comic-book artist best known for his role in creating Spider-Man, has died at the age of 90.

Ditko is credited with helping to popularize the Marvel Comics universe, whose characters today can be found everywhere from blockbuster films, to television shows, to theme park rides, to merchandise. Working alongside artists Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, Ditko was a creative force behind characters like Dr. Strange, the Incredible Hulk and Iron Man.

Federal prosecutors said Friday they will drop all of the remaining cases stemming from the Inauguration Day demonstrations in Washington, D.C. last year.

As NPR reported then, a protest turned confrontational when a small number of "black-clad protesters broke windows and police responded with pepper spray and a concussive device."

For the first time since the country gained independence from white minority rule in 1980, Zimbabwe has a new leader. At a packed stadium in the capital city Harare, Emmerson Mnangagwa promised not to "squander this moment" to change the culture of politics in his country.

Rep. Joe Barton, R-Texas, apologized to his constituents in a statement Wednesday for a lewd photo of him that was published anonymously Tuesday on Twitter. The congressman said that he sent the photo to a woman he was in a consensual relationship with while separated from his second wife.

"I am sorry I did not use better judgment during those days. I am sorry that I let my constituents down," the statement read.

Updated at 8:31 p.m. ET

In the weeks since allegations of sexual harassment and assault against movie producer Harvey Weinstein became public, a number of other stories of abuse have come to light: in Hollywood, in newsrooms (including NPR's), and now, in statehouses across the country.

In recent months, some Brits have expressed their distaste for European Union regulations — a frustration that helped motivate the Brexit vote last summer.

But this weekend, new regulations on the tobacco industry came into force in the United Kingdom, and they go even further than what an EU directive required.

Updated at 4:35 p.m. ET

President Trump has announced that Army Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster will be his new national security adviser. McMaster will replace retired Army Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn, who was forced to resign after revelations that he had misled top White House officials about his conversations with the Russian ambassador to the U.S.

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