farm bill

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Kentucky Republican Congressman James Comer says there are a lot of minor differences between the House and Senate versions of the Farm Bill, but "the big gorilla in the room" is SNAP work requirements.

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Republican Congressman James Comer of Kentucky's First District says being one of the only farmers in Congress and being a former state agriculture commissioner made him a frontrunner to serve on the conference committee that will negotiate the final version of the Farm Bill.

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A Kentucky congressman with deep roots in agriculture will serve on the conference committee assigned to negotiate a final version of the next federal farm bill.

Nicole Erwin / WKMS

Kentucky's First District U.S. Congressman James Comer helped to pass the house's version of the federal farm bill Thursday.

If Republicans in Congress have their way, millions of people who get food aid through the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP) will have to find a job or attend job training classes for about 20 hours each week, or lose their benefits.

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The U.S. House Agriculture Committee introduced their 2018 Farm Bill Thursday. The bill increases work requirements for food-stamp benefits, preserves provisions for federal crop insurance and the conservation reserve program. What isn’t included is hemp.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

"I think a town hall is a great display of democracy," U.S. Congressman James Comer said to a well-attended room on Murray State University's campus. 

Official Photo/kyagr.com

Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles is now the Secretary-Treasurer of the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture (NASDA). Quarles was elected on Thursday. 

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

U.S. Congressman James Comer held a two-part town hall forum at the Hopkinsville Community College Monday night, having made earlier stops in Taylor and Simpson Counties. The evening began with a Kentucky Farm Bureau listening session, discussing challenges in crafting the next Farm Bill and agriculture industry representatives outlining what they want in the next legislation. A more informal event followed, answering questions from members of local groups opposing President Trump's agenda: 'Pennyroyal Indivisible' and 'Resist Kentucky.'

J. Tyler Franklin/WFPL News

Rand Paul told Kentucky farm leaders Thursday he supports federal crop insurance programs but did not say whether he would support the next federal farm bill if he is re-elected to the U.S. Senate. 

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