Kentucky General Assembly

J. TYLER FRANKLIN / WFPL

The state agency that can fine lawmakers for ethical violations is asking the legislature to strengthen its own ethics code, including an explicit ban on sexual harassment and discrimination.

J. Tyler Franklin / WFPL

Kentucky’s public schools would be required to post the national motto of “In God We Trust” inside their buildings under legislation that’s been pre-filed for next legislative session. 

Alexey Stiop, 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky’s public schools would be required to post the national motto of “In God We Trust” inside their buildings under legislation that’s been pre-filed for next legislative session.  The bill is being sponsored by State Representative Brandon Reed, a LaRue County evangelist.

“In a time of rampant drug use, increasing school violence, and mounting cases of suicide among our youth, we need God in our schools now more than ever,” stated Reed.

J. Tyler Franklin / WFPL

Drivers will need to maintain a three-foot buffer when they pass bicyclists, health educators will be required to teach sex abstinence in public schools and sweeping changes to Kentucky’s adoption and foster care system are all included in new state laws that go into effect on Saturday.

BankingBum / Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 3.0)

  State lawmakers on Monday heard recommendations about how to how to make Kentucky schools safer in the wake of the deadly shooting at Marshall County High School earlier this year and similar tragedies across the country.

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Kentucky has lots of abandoned private sewer systems causing problems for homeowners. To fix this, a state lawmaker sponsored a bill to let local governments buy these systems, even if they are outside the government's boundaries.

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Kentucky's 2018 legislative session set a record with $10.67 million spent on lobbying.

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Next week, Kentucky voters will head to the polls to weigh in on primary elections, including who to nominate for state legislative elections this fall.

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  A judge has ruled Kentucky lawmakers broke the law when they held a private meeting to discuss changes to the state’s public pension system.

Ryland Barton / Kentucky Public Radio

  This year’s Kentucky General Assembly was book-ended by turmoil, but over the course of nearly four months the Republican-led legislature was still able to wrangle the votes to approve politically volatile policies like changing pension benefits for public workers and overhauling Kentucky’s tax code amid intense protests from public workers, especially teachers.

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