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Johnson & Johnson Vaccine And Blood Clots: What You Need To Know

Updated April 13, 2021 at 4:50 PM ET Federal health officials have called for a "pause" in the use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine after reports that six women who got the vaccine developed blood clots afterward. Close to 7 million people have gotten this vaccine in the U.S. to date. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the blood clots are extremely rare but that it is reviewing the cases. The agency says it expects this pause to last for "a matter of days." The CDC's...

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J. Tyler Franklin / WFPL

Gov. Andy Beshear is temporarily halting use of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine in Kentucky. The governor said he is following a recommendation from the CDC after the agency found cases of blood clotting in six women. More than 6.8 million people have received the shot nationwide since it was approved in February. 

Tony Webster / Flickr

Tennessee could be off the table for future NFL, NCAA and FIFA competitions because of the state’s new transgender sports law.

Cheryl Gerber

State leaders around the Ohio Valley will temporarily have fewer doses of COVID-19 vaccine to distribute following the Food and Drug Administration’s decision Tuesday to pause the use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. Regional officials gave no indication that they will have shortages of vaccines as a result, but the pause on the Johnson & Johnson “one dose” vaccine could complicate efforts to inoculate hard-to-reach populations. 

Updated April 13, 2021 at 4:50 PM ET

Federal health officials have called for a "pause" in the use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine after reports that six women who got the vaccine developed blood clots afterward. Close to 7 million people have gotten this vaccine in the U.S. to date.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the blood clots are extremely rare but that it is reviewing the cases. The agency says it expects this pause to last for "a matter of days."

The U.S. intelligence community said Tuesday that it views four countries as posing the main national security challenges in the coming year: China, followed by Russia, Iran and North Korea.

"China increasingly is a near-peer competitor, challenging the United States in multiple arenas — especially economically, militarily, and technologically — and is pushing to change global norms," said the report released by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

President Biden will withdraw all remaining U.S. troops from Afghanistan by Sept. 11, the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attacks that prompted America's involvement in its longest war, a senior administration official told reporters on Tuesday.

Some 2,500 U.S. troops remain in Afghanistan, and as many as 1,000 more special operations forces are also reported to be in the country. There were more than 100,000 at the war's peak in 2011.

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin's attorney called on Shawanda Hill to testify on Tuesday morning. Chauvin is on trial on murder and manslaughter charges in George Floyd's death.

Hill told the court she was at the Cup Foods store last May 25 when she ran into Floyd, whom she knew. She described his behavior as "happy, normal, talking, alert."

She said Floyd offered to give her a ride to her house, and she went with him to the car he was driving.

1778011 / Pixabay

In the next installment of Sounds Good's sport psychology series, Tracy Ross and Dan Wann discuss the relationship between sports organizations and spectators in the age of COVID-19, multimillion-dollar franchises, and a seemingly endless supply of sport consumption opportunities. 

Johny Boyle / WFPL News

For eight months, Hoosiers had to wear masks in public.

Modern History / Bandcamp

Chicago-based rock band Modern History's upcoming album Remember comes after a ten-year-long hiatus. Frontman John Hermle speaks with Tracy Ross about what happened during that time, from treating mental health disorders to playing onstage with Hermle's musical heroes. 

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Cheryl Gerber

J&J Vaccine Pause Cuts Into Available Doses In The Ohio Valley

State leaders around the Ohio Valley will temporarily have fewer doses of COVID-19 vaccine to distribute following the Food and Drug Administration’s decision Tuesday to pause the use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. Regional officials gave no indication that they will have shortages of vaccines as a result, but the pause on the Johnson & Johnson “one dose” vaccine could complicate efforts to inoculate hard-to-reach populations.

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