Glynis Board

Ohio Valley ReSource Reporter at WVPB (Wheeling, WV)

Glynis Board drills deep for her ReSource stories on energy and the environment. She hails from the Northern Panhandle of West Virginia and is based in Wheeling. Glynis is a West Virginia University graduate who has honed her video and audio storytelling skills at West Virginia Public Broadcasting since 2004. Her work has won the Edward R. Murrow Award and “outstanding reporter” honors from the AP.

Erica Peterson, WFPL

In the wake of the hearings the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency hosted in West Virginia last week, the agency has decided to schedule more public hearings about the repeal of the Clean Power Plan - carbon regulations that aimed to limit greenhouse gas emissions. 

Arnold Paul, via Wikimedia Commons

The coal industry cheered the Trump administration’s EPA at recent hearings in West Virginia for the agency’s move to repeal the Clean Power Plan. The Obama-era rule would have reduced greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. 

Glynis Board | Ohio Valley ReSource

Last month the Trump administration’s Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt chose an eastern Kentucky mining town as the venue to announce his intent to repeal the Clean Power Plan, an Obama-era rule that sought to limit greenhouse gas emissions. On Tuesday the agency returned to coal country to conduct its only public hearing on the matter in Charleston, West Virginia. 

Kenn W. Kiser, morgueFile.com

Several lawmakers from the Ohio Valley region have joined a bipartisan push to fund what’s called carbon capture and storage. That technology can strip CO2 from power plant emissions. But it is also extremely expensive. Glynis Board of the Ohio Valley ReSource reports that the mounting urgency to address climate change has caused some who were skeptical of the technology to take a fresh look.

Peabody Energy, Inc., via Wikimedia Commons

The Environmental Protection Agency’s move to end the Clean Power Plan is the Trump administration’s latest attempt to support the struggling coal industry. The Department of Energy is also pushing a new way to subsidize coal power. But a new study suggests market forces — not regulations — will still make more coal power plants in the region vulnerable.

Glynis Board, Ohio Valley ReSource

  Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt used a trip to Kentucky coal country to announce the Trump administration’s plans to dismantle a regulation that sought to limit carbon pollution.

Courtesy office of Sen. Manchin

West Virginia Democratic U.S. Senator Joe Manchin will not support the Trump administration’s nominee to lead the federal agency in charge of mine safety. 

Photos by Kara Lofton, illustration by Jesse Wright, WVPB

The hurricane season’s super-charged storms highlighted the importance of disaster planning, and it’s not just a concern for the coasts. Scientists warn that heavy rain events have become more common in the Ohio Valley. Here's how some flood-prone communities are preparing for what experts call “the new normal” of extreme weather. 

APPALACHIAN OIL AND NATURAL GAS RESEARCH CONSORTIUM / WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY ENERGY INSTITUTE

The idea of building a natural gas storage hub in the region continues to gain traction. West Virginia University is set to release a report this week that explores the geologic possibilities of storing liquid natural gas products in underground reservoirs.

Southwings and Vivian Stockman

For more than a decade Ohio Valley residents have been asking government agencies to respond to science that links coal mining to health problems in nearby communities. Last year the prestigious National Academy of Sciences launched a study on the issue. But the Trump administration has stopped it. Glynis Board reports on what that means for coal communities and the scientists studying them.

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