Mara Liasson

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What can the Republican convention add to the image of a president who's put himself in constant public view for years? Republicans are giving their best answers to that question.

The last three American presidents all won reelection, and they all knew voters would reward them, not for their accomplishments, but for their future plans.

Bill Clinton promised to build a "bridge to the 21st century" in 1996. George W. Bush offered safety and prosperity in 2004, built on conservative economic and national security policies. For Barack Obama in 2012, it was all about protecting the middle class as the country continued recovering from the Great Recession.

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LULU GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

Tomorrow, it will be the Republicans' turn to put on their national convention in what so far has been an unorthodox but remarkably smooth experiment in virtual conventions. Joining us in real life is national political correspondent Mara Liasson.

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This was one message from Democrats on the first night of their national convention.

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In a recent campaign ad, Joe Biden is behind the wheel of a 1967 Corvette Stingray, in his trademark aviator sunglasses.

"I love this car, nothing but incredible memories. Every time I get in, I think of my dad and Beau," Biden says, referring to his late son. "God, could my dad drive a car."

It's pure nostalgia. But then Biden pivots to his pitch to restore American manufacturing.

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Tonight, President Trump declined to say whether he believes Sen. Kamala Harris is eligible to be vice president - this following an op-ed in Newsweek that incorrectly raised doubts about Harris' eligibility.

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After months of drama over where and how the Republican National Convention will be held, President Trump has mostly pulled the plug.

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