Rhonda Miller (KPR)

Rhonda Miller began as reporter and host for All Things Considered on WKU Public Radio in 2015.  She has worked as Gulf Coast reporter for Mississippi Public Broadcasting, where she won Associated Press, Edward R. Murrow and Green Eyeshade awards for stories on dead sea turtles, health and legal issues arising from the 2010 BP oil spill and homeless veterans.
 
She has worked at Rhode Island Public Radio,  as an intern at WVTF Public Radio in Roanoke, Virginia, and at the South Florida Sun-Sentinel and Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.
 
Rhonda’s freelance work called Writing Into Sound includes stories for Voice of America, WSHU Public Radio in Fairfield, Conn., NPR and AARP Prime Time Radio.
 
She has a master’s degree in media studies from Rhode Island College and a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Boston University.
 
Rhonda enjoys quiet water kayaking, riding her bicycle and folk music. She was a volunteer DJ for Root-N-Branch at WUMD community radio in Dartmouth, Mass.
 

Nicole Erwin / Ohio Valley ReSource

Trade disputes between the U.S. and other countries are leaving many Kentucky farmers uncertain about the global market for soybeans. The crop has been the state’s largest agricultural export.

Chantel Schmitt, 123rf stock photo

The U.S. Department of Agriculture 2018 crop report for Kentucky shows both  Henderson and Christian counties among the state’s leaders in production. 

Marek Szucs / 123rf Stock Photo

Kentucky farmers have until April 5 to sign up with the Farms to Food Banks program if they want to sell produce that’s not considered ‘picture perfect’ enough for grocery stores.

kickbuttsday.org

Communities across Kentucky will join a national event on March 20 aimed at discouraging the use of  e-cigarettes and tobacco.

Somsak Sudthangtum / 123rf Stock photo

Much of the effort to confront the opioid crisis in America has focused on young adult and middle-aged populations. But, a new study finds that more older adults, including those in Kentucky, are showing up in emergency rooms because of opioid misuse.

Bowling Green Housing Authority

A new grocery store is coming soon to what the U.S. Department of Agriculture has determined is a Bowling Green ‘food desert,’ where it’s difficult for residents to buy affordable or good quality fresh food. 

Feeding Kentucky via Facebook

The organization previously called the Kentucky Association of Food Banks has a new name and it’s pledging to continue initiatives to alleviate food insecurity. But even with the continuing support of many state leaders, the initiatives aren't making much of a dent in the state’s problem with hunger. 

One year after a student shot two classmates to death in Marshall County, Kentucky and a former student massacred 17 students and educators at a high school in Parkland, Florida, communities continue to search for ways to bring a sense of safety back to the classroom.

Kentucky has a free school safety tipline created by a former teacher and administrator who worked in the district where  a deadly high school shooting occurred more than two decades ago. 

Karen McCuiston was a teacher in McCracken County schools  prior to becoming the district’s public relations director in 1997.  She never expected that three months into her new job she would be the spokesperson for a tragedy that, until that time, was unimaginable in rural Kentucky. A 14-year-old student shot three classmates to  death at Heath High School in West Paducah on Dec. 1, 1997.


CHRIS CONLEY/TWITTER

The high water level of the Ohio River has the Owensboro-Daviess County region under a flood warning until Friday, Feb. 22.  Many roads are closed and the county is handing out sandbags on Saturday morning.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture reports that Kentucky soybean farmers harvested a record breaking crop last year, with 103 million bushels. That’s up one percent from the previous year. The increase was due mainly to more acreage, with 50,000 additional acres of soybeans planted across Kentucky last year.

But that record harvest is facing market forces impacted by America’s tariff and trade disputes, especially with China.  Some Kentucky soybean farmers are storing the beans, trying to wait until market conditions improve. 

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