Sasha Ingber

Sasha Ingber is a reporter on NPR's breaking news desk, where she covers national and international affairs of the day.

She got her start at NPR as a regular contributor to Goats and Soda, reporting on terrorist attacks of aid organizations in Afghanistan, the man-made cholera epidemic in Yemen, poverty in the United States, and other human rights and global health stories.

Before joining NPR, she contributed numerous news articles and short-form, digital documentaries to National Geographic, covering an array of topics that included the controversy over undocumented children in the United States, ISIS' genocide of minorities in Iraq, wildlife trafficking, climate change, and the spatial memory of slime.

She was the editor of a U.S. Department of State team that monitored and debunked Russian disinformation following the annexation of Crimea in 2014. She was also the associate editor of a Smithsonian culture magazine, Journeys.

In 2016, she co-founded Music in Exile, a nonprofit organization that documents the songs and stories of people who have been displaced by war, oppression, and regional instability. Starting in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, she interviewed, photographed, and recorded refugees who fled war-torn Syria and religious minorities who were internally displaced in Iraq. The work has led Sasha to appear live on-air for radio stations as well as on pre-recorded broadcasts, including PRI's The World.

As a multimedia journalist, her articles and photographs have appeared in additional publications including The Washington Post Magazine, Smithsonian Magazine, The Atlantic, and The Willamette Week.

Before starting a career in journalism, she investigated the international tiger trade for The World Bank's Global Tiger Initiative, researched healthcare fraud for the National Healthcare Anti-Fraud Association, and taught dance at a high school in Washington, D.C.

A Pulitzer Center grantee, she holds a master's degree in nonfiction writing from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor's degree in film, television, and radio from the University of Wisconsin in Madison.

A Web security company is dropping its protections for 8chan, a controversial online message board where people have posted hateful screeds before carrying out violent and deadly attacks.

The forum describes itself as "the darkest reaches of the Internet."

Minutes before the shooting that claimed the lives of at least 22 people in El Paso, Texas, the suspected gunman is believed to have posted a lengthy and hateful diatribe to 8chan. The post described an "invasion" of Hispanics at the southern U.S. border and an effort to "reclaim" the United States.

A landmark Cold War-era arms control treaty between the United States and Russia officially collapsed on Friday, triggering fears of a new arms race.

The Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, signed in 1987 by President Ronald Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, banned ground-launched cruise missiles with a range between 500 and 5,500 km (310-3,400 miles). More than 2,600 missiles were destroyed by 1991.

Updated at 10 a.m. ET

Britain's Conservative Party has chosen Boris Johnson to become the country's next prime minister, replacing the pragmatic and sometimes colorless Theresa May with a bombastic populist who favors a no-deal Brexit.

Johnson walked to the lectern inside London's Queen Elizabeth II Centre, thanking his opponent, Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt, and the outgoing May.

The Trump administration has implemented its strongest effort yet to curb asylum claims, but an internal memo shows that U.S. asylum officers weren't briefed until just hours before the sweeping immigration rule went into effect Tuesday.

North Korea warned Tuesday that negotiations with the United States could falter and that its nuclear and missile tests might resume if the U.S. and South Korea move forward with planned military exercises.

Updated at 11:50 a.m. ET

China's economy grew at the slowest pace in 27 years, as the trade war with the United States takes a toll.

The second-largest economy in the world grew 6.2% in the second quarter of 2019, a drop from 6.4% in the first quarter, according to data released by the Chinese government.

The pace of growth in the second quarter was at its slowest since 1992.

Updated at 1 p.m. ET

The Smithsonian's National Museum of American History may add drawings made by formerly detained migrant children to its famous collection.

The drawings depict time spent in the custody of U.S. Customs and Border Protection. Some of the children's images appeared to show stick figures with frowns and people on floors under blankets.

The largest manufacturer of police body cameras is rejecting the possibility of selling facial recognition technology – at least, for now.

Axon, formerly known as Taser International, has worked with more than 18,000 law enforcement agencies worldwide, selling a suite of products that include body cameras and software. It says 48 of 79 major city law enforcement agencies in North America are Axon customers.

The National Rifle Association has shut down its online TV channel and lost its chief lobbyist, new setbacks for a group that also is the subject of another congressional investigation, NPR has learned.

The NRA has struggled under both scrutiny from the outside for its connections to Russia's interference in American politics and from internal divisions over its leadership and its finances.

International investigators have accused three Russians and one Ukrainian of taking part in the attack on Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, a passenger plane that was shot down nearly five years ago, killing all 298 people on board. They will face murder charges for their alleged involvement in the tragedy.

The plane left Amsterdam for Kuala Lumpur on July 17, 2014. It crashed over eastern Ukraine, a smoldering wreckage of civilian parts in the midst of a battle between Ukrainian security forces and Russia-back separatists.

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