Sasha Ingber

Sasha Ingber is a reporter on NPR's breaking news desk, where she covers national and international affairs of the day.

She got her start at NPR as a regular contributor to Goats and Soda, reporting on terrorist attacks of aid organizations in Afghanistan, the man-made cholera epidemic in Yemen, poverty in the United States, and other human rights and global health stories.

Before joining NPR, she contributed numerous news articles and short-form, digital documentaries to National Geographic, covering an array of topics that included the controversy over undocumented children in the United States, ISIS' genocide of minorities in Iraq, wildlife trafficking, climate change, and the spatial memory of slime.

She was the editor of a U.S. Department of State team that monitored and debunked Russian disinformation following the annexation of Crimea in 2014. She was also the associate editor of a Smithsonian culture magazine, Journeys.

In 2016, she co-founded Music in Exile, a nonprofit organization that documents the songs and stories of people who have been displaced by war, oppression, and regional instability. Starting in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, she interviewed, photographed, and recorded refugees who fled war-torn Syria and religious minorities who were internally displaced in Iraq. The work has led Sasha to appear live on-air for radio stations as well as on pre-recorded broadcasts, including PRI's The World.

As a multimedia journalist, her articles and photographs have appeared in additional publications including The Washington Post Magazine, Smithsonian Magazine, The Atlantic, and The Willamette Week.

Before starting a career in journalism, she investigated the international tiger trade for The World Bank's Global Tiger Initiative, researched healthcare fraud for the National Healthcare Anti-Fraud Association, and taught dance at a high school in Washington, D.C.

A Pulitzer Center grantee, she holds a master's degree in nonfiction writing from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor's degree in film, television, and radio from the University of Wisconsin in Madison.

Maria Butina, the Russian woman who pleaded guilty last year to working as a clandestine agent in the United States, will be sentenced on April 26, U.S. District Judge Tanya Chutkan said Thursday.

Butina, 30, sat silently in a green jump suit during the hearing. She faces a maximum of five years in prison but could receive zero to six months because of a plea deal.

She was arrested in July and has been detained ever since, with federal prosecutors arguing that she was a flight risk.

Facebook announced Wednesday that it intends to ban content that glorifies white nationalism and separatism, a major policy shift that will begin next week.

"It's clear that these concepts are deeply linked to organized hate groups and have no place on our services," the company said in a statement.

About five years since the war in eastern Ukraine between government forces and Russian-backed separatists began, triggering a surge in propaganda and disinformation, some students in four cities across the country are learning how to better assess what they're reading, seeing and hearing.

A report released Friday by global education organization IREX says that students in 8th and 9th grades were better able to identify false information and hate speech after teachers integrated the organization's media literacy techniques into their lessons.

Unknown to hundreds of millions of Facebook users, their passwords were sitting in plain text inside the company's data storage, leaving them vulnerable to potential employee misuse and cyberattack for years.

"To be clear, these passwords were never visible to anyone outside of Facebook and we have found no evidence to date that anyone internally abused or improperly accessed them," Facebook's Vice President for Engineering, Security and Privacy Pedro Canahuati said in a statement Thursday.

Russians, fearing digital isolation and more censorship on the horizon, gathered in the streets of Moscow and other cities on Sunday to protest a new bill calling for Russia to be cut off from the global Internet.

European Union officials have moved to clarify travel regulations for U.S. citizens, following erroneous reports this week that Americans will soon be required to apply for visas.

Updated at 10:30 a.m.

A U.S. citizen has been arrested in Moscow on suspicion of espionage, Russia's Federal Security Service announced Monday.

The domestic security agency named the detained individual as Paul Whelan. It said in a short statement that he was caught during a spying operation, without adding further details.

The security service said a criminal investigation is underway. If convicted of espionage, Whelan faces up to 20 years in prison.

When an Amazon customer in Germany contacted the company to review his archived data, he wasn't expecting to receive recordings of a stranger speaking in the privacy of a home.

Prosecutors have unsealed the first U.S. criminal charges filed since the Panama Papers, a trove of secret documents revealing details of offshore shell-companies, were leaked to reporters and published in 2016.

In a 67-page indictment, the Southern District of New York named four individuals: Ramses Owens, Dirk Brauer, Richard Gaffey and Harald Joachim Von Der Goltz. They are charged on 11 counts, including conspiracy and lying to investigators.

A North Carolina graduate student who led a protest against her university's plan to bring a Confederate statue back to campus has been arrested and charged with inciting a riot and assaulting a police officer.

Maya Little, a 26-year-old graduate student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, turned herself in at the Orange County Courthouse on Tuesday, UNC spokesperson Randy Young told NPR.

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