Bacteria

Melanie Moser / CDC

Federal health officials say they've confirmed more than 500 cases of people who became sick with an intestinal illness after eating McDonald's salads.

If you want to cut your risk of catching the flu on your next flight, pick a window seat and stay put.

That's a key take-home message of a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Back in August, a study came out about bacteria in kitchen sponges that sent home chefs into a frenzy.

But when we looked carefully at the study, we realized much of the news coverage about it was incorrect.

The study, published in Scientific Reports, undertook a thorough investigation into how many critters are living in used kitchen sponges. And the results were jawdropping.

Nicole Erwin | Ohio Valley ReSource

A death in a Nevada hospital made national headlines this month because the patient’s infection could not be treated with any of the antibiotics doctors usually rely on. Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem. Part of the solution could come from farms. Starting this month a new rule limits the antibiotics used on livestock. Ohio Valley ReSource agriculture reporter Nicole Erwin and WFPL’s health reporter Lisa Gillespie teamed up to learn more about this effort to stop “superbugs.”

cdph.ca.gov

A leader in a Kentucky-based patient advocacy group is calling for more timely information about drug-resistant bacteria cases.  Members of a state legislative health panel got a briefing earlier this month. 

Frozen vegetables are a staple in many diets, so a huge recall of them has us peering at the packages in our freezers.

On Tuesday evening, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced an outbreak of the deadly Listeria monocytogenes bacteria — and frozen vegetables and fruits are believed to be the cause.

The number of confirmed cases of Legionnaires' disease at California's San Quentin prison is holding steady at six, one of three outbreaks of Legionnaires' around the country that have sickened dozens and killed 20.

Another 95 San Quentin inmates are under observation because of respiratory illness, state officials said, but they have not been diagnosed with Legionnaires' disease. The inmates are being treated at San Quentin's medical unit.