Braidy Industries

Jose Antonio Baeza Diaz / 123rf Stock Photo

A Kentucky appeals court has ruled that Gov. Matt Bevin's administration should hand over records identifying shareholders of a company planning to build a state-subsidized $1.5 billion aluminum rolling mill near Ashland.

Jose Antonio Baeza Diaz / 123rf Stock Photo

The company that’s planning to build an aluminum mill in northeastern Kentucky is seeking new investors to help it complete construction of the massive project.

J. Tyler Franklin / WFPL

Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin's administration has been ordered to pay the Courier Journal's legal cost because it refused to release public records identifying shareholders of a company planning to build a state-subsidized $1.5 billion aluminum rolling mill near Ashland.

Cabinet For Health and Family Services/Screenshot, via WFPL

This week in Kentucky politics, Gov. Matt Bevin said he’s partnering with a former Democratic congressman to help people navigate the state’s new Medicaid rules. We found out that lobbyists set a new spending record at the state legislature as lawmakers made changes to the tax code. Plus, a state-funded aluminum mill broke ground in northeastern Kentucky and  Bevin asked for a judge to recuse himself from the lawsuit over the new pension bill.

Becca Schimmel | Ohio Valley ReSource

Update:

President Trump met with steel and aluminum industry leaders Thursday to talk about implementing tariffs on metal imports. The Ohio Valley is home to one of the last US aluminum smelters and many industries depend on steel and aluminum. The president indicated steep tariffs will come sometime next week.

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS, PUBLIC DOMAIN

  An aluminum company planning a state-subsidized $1.3 billion facility in Greenup County has released the names of its shareholders. Braidy Industries had been keeping those identities a secret.

Wikimedia Commons, Public Domain

The CEO of an aluminum mill slated to open in eastern Kentucky claims the company will be able to sell aluminum for 50 percent cheaper than its competitors, allowing it to pay workers $65,000-per-year starting salaries.

Becca Schimmel, WKU Public Radio

The head of the company that is planning to build a $1.3 billion aluminum plant in eastern Kentucky claims the state’s new right-to-work law will help it undercut competitors.

Ryland Barton / Kentucky Public Radio

Kentucky's attorney general says the economic development cabinet wrongfully denied a newspaper's request for the names of investors in a company that received millions in public funding for a new aluminum plant.

J. Tyler Franklin, Louisville Public Media

Governor Matt Bevin says Kentucky has surpassed its record for business investments in less than half a year. The Republican governor said on Friday that business investments in the state already top $5.8 billion.

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