Dan Wann

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In the next Valentine's-themed installment of Sounds Good's sport psychology series, Murray State professor of psychology, Dan Wann, is joined in the WKMS studio by wife, Michelle Wann. The Wanns discuss the mid-season origin of their relationship and what it's like being in such a sport-centered partnership.

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In the next installment of Sounds Good's sport psychology series, Tracy Ross and Dan Wann discuss how sports fans learn to cope with particularly upsetting losses, team dissolutions, and free-agent players who move from a fan's favorite team to a rival.

In the last installment of Sounds Good's sport psychology series, Tracy Ross and psychology professor Dan Wann, Ph.D., discuss the process of socialization in sport fandoms. This week, they discuss how an individual becomes a fan of particular teams and players.

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Sounds Good has explored what it means to be a sports fan, basking in reflective glory (BIRGing), and cutting off reflective failures (CORFing) - this week, Tracy Ross and Murray State professor of psychology, Dan Wann, Ph.D., go to the origin of sport fandom: how one becomes socialized into being a fan.

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From only eating specific meals on game day to booger hexes to lighting incense in front of a backyard Buddhist statue - sports fans are no strangers to superstitious behavior. Murray State professor of psychology, Dan Wann, Ph.D., and Tracy Ross continue their sports psychology series with a discussion on sport superstition. 

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Two weeks ago, Tracy Ross and Murray State professor of psychology, Dan Wann, discussed BIRGing, or basking in reflective glory. This week, Wann returns to the studio to discuss the opposite phenomenon: CORFing, or cutting off reflective failure.

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Die-hard fandom members, bandwagon jumpers, two-teamers - no matter how long or in what way a person supports a sports team, they all share a common characteristic: the love of BIRGing, or Basking In Reflective Glory. Murray State professor of psychology, Dan Wann, visits Sounds Good to discuss this phenomenon.

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Fandoms exist over a wide spectrum of activities and interests, from sports, to the arts, to television shows and movies. Sport fandoms are a particularly well-known sect of avid supporters, but what makes them so unique? Murray State professor of psychology, Dan Wann, visits Sounds Good to discuss.