drinking water

Sydney Boles / Ohio Valley ReSource

A growing body of research shows that people living near mountaintop removal coal mines face increased risks of disease linked to pollutants in air and water. A new report from a human rights group argues that the mining industry has tried to suppress the science about health risks and has forced coalfield communities to take on the industry’s costs. Residents are hoping for clear answers and clean water.

Gage Skidmore, Flickr Commons (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Republican West Virginia Sen. Shelley Moore Capito pressed the head of the Environmental Protection Agency Wednesday over recently released emails that show White House and EPA officials attempted to delay a new federal standard for C-8 and other similar toxic water-polluting chemicals, which have for decades been detected in several water systems in the Ohio Valley.

Wasin Pummarin, 123RF Stock Photo

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has appointed a committee to develop a statewide plan for future water availability in the state.

Cayusa / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

Kentucky is ranked near the top of a list no one wants to be on: the states with the highest number of people affected by health-based violations of federal drinking water laws.

Dave Mistich, WVPB

  The chemical giant DuPont made an offer Monday to pay more than half-a-billion dollars to settle water contamination lawsuits pending in federal court.

Benny Becker | Ohio Valley ReSource

Drinking water from the tap is an exercise in trust that most of us take for granted. But in Martin County, Kentucky, prolonged problems with the water system have many residents worried that their health is at risk. Benny Becker of the Ohio Valley ReSource has the story of how a community in coal country lost faith in both their water and their government. 

Cayusa / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

new report says some Kentuckians could be drinking a cancer-causing chemical called chromium-6.

Helmut Seisenberger, 123rf Stock Photo

A study of drinking water systems found 6 million Americans, including people in West Virginia, Kentucky, and Ohio, are living with drinking water containing chemicals linked to a host of health problems.

Before you take a gulp of water, try to mentally trace where that water that just gushed out of your taps has been: How did it go from that weird-tasting raindrop to the clear, odorless water that is sitting in your glass now?

Safe drinking water is a privilege Americans often take for granted — until a health crisis like the one in Flint, Mich., happens that makes us think about where it comes from and how we get it.