flooding

Kara Lofton, WVPB

 A new analysis of flooding risk that accounts for the effects of climate change finds many more homes in Appalachian communities in Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia are at risk of flooding than the federal government’s emergency managers have indicated. In 12 Appalachian counties in the region, at least half of all residences are at risk, and in West Virginia one in five homes carry a high risk of flooding, according to an analysis of the data released by the nonprofit First Street Foundation

The Federal Emergency Management Agency fails to help tens of thousands of people whose homes have repeatedly flooded, according to a report by the Office of the Inspector General for the Department of Homeland Security.

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

Thousands of residents in central Michigan have been forced to evacuate their homes after rapidly rising waters from the Tittabawassee River following two dam failures threatened to flood parts of Midland County under as much as 9 feet of water.

The ongoing flooding is projected to be "historic," Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said.

National Weather Service

  The entire Commonwealth of Kentucky is under a flash flood watch as rains move in Wednesday afternoon and evening.

Sydney Boles / Ohio Valley Resource

  Heavy rains caused extensive flooding across eastern Kentucky this week, and city and county officials say it could take weeks to fix some of the damage. 

Kara Lofton / WVPB

The rain came hard and fast early on the morning of June 23, 2016. By 2 p.m., water was knee deep in Bill Bell’s appliance store on Main Street in Rainelle, a small town on the western edge of Greenbrier County, West Virginia. Bell began elevating the washing machines and dishwashers, thinking that would be enough. Within hours, he’d lose it all. Today, his shop is up and running once again, but the memory of the flood runs deep.

Sergey Kuzmin / 123rf Stock Photo

Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker is urging residents to report flood damage to their county's emergency management agencies. He says such action will increase the likelihood the state will qualify for federal disaster aid.

TVA via Twitter

The Tennessee Valley Authority is in a flood control operation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to help reduce flooding on the Ohio River.

Tennessee Valley Authority via Facebook

Tennessee Valley Authority said they averted $1.6 billion in damages in holding back February’s record breaking rainfall.

Wikimedia Commons

  Emergency Management officials in west Kentucky and southern Illinois along the Ohio River say severe flooding is finally under control. But the National Weather Service says water levels from Paducah to Cairo, Illinois, will remain at a “major” flood stage for at least another week.

 

EMA officials said that might close roads down and cut people off in low-lying, rural areas. Livingston County EMA Director Brent Stringer said even though the worst of flooding is past, people should reach out if they need any help.

 

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