food

Bartolomé Perez has made countless vats of fries and flipped more burgers than he cares to remember in his 30 years of working at a McDonald's in Los Angeles.

In that time, he's joined several strikes to demand higher wages and better benefits for workers. But the stakes felt very different during the coronavirus pandemic.

"We are between life and death," Perez says, speaking in Spanish. "You know that every time you go out, it could be your last ... it could be the most expensive hamburger you make in your life."

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS, PUBLIC DOMAIN

The concession stands at the Cinemark movie theater in Paducah are closed due to a roach infestation.

The marketing is enticing: Get stronger muscles and healthier bodies with minimal effort by adding protein powder to your morning shake or juice drink. Or grab a protein bar at lunch or for a quick snack. Today, you can find protein supplements everywhere — online or at the pharmacy, grocery store or health food store. They come in powders, pills and bars.

Beyond the Burger - Duncan's Market & Grill

Aug 23, 2018
Austin Carter

It’s time for another installment of our occasional series, Beyond the Burger where Austin Carter seeks out stories of an iconic American food and the people behind it. Today he visits a spot in eastern Calloway County, that provides more than just a great burger but also a sense of community and history to boot.

MAREK SZUCS, 123RF STOCK PHOTO

  A popular TV cooking competition is coming to the commonwealth. Bravo has announced that its next season of “Top Chef” will be filmed in Kentucky.

Stop Crying! Tear-Free Onions Are Here

Feb 8, 2018

Using onions to explain away crying is a familiar gag. On The Brady Bunch, housekeeper Alice answers the phone and cries as the caller tells her a sad story. After hanging up she says, "Darn onions," holding up the offending allium. And Rowlf the Dog sang on The Muppet Show, "I never harmed an onion. So why should they make me cry?"

Would you eat venison if there was a chance it could slowly eat away at your brain?

If there's a slight possibility, it doesn't bother Patrick States. On the menu this evening for his wife and two daughters at their Northglenn, Colo., home are pan-seared venison steaks with mashed potatoes and a whiskey cream sauce.

"We each have our specialty, actually," says States as the steak sizzles. "The girls made elk tamales this morning, but we use [venison or elk] in spaghetti, chili, soup, whatever."

Nutmeg, cinnamon and cloves are probably ramping up in importance in your spice cabinet right about now — the classic flavors of the winter season. But while you might be shopping for local ingredients for your favorite recipes for eggnog or maple-glazed ham, the odds are that the spices you're using were imported from the other side of the world.

Lior Lev Sercarz thinks spices should be local, too.

The delivery of federal food benefits for millions of low-income people is likely to change after the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced Tuesday it'll allow states more flexibility in how they dole out the money.

Pick up any packaged, processed food, and there's a decent chance that one of its listed ingredients will be "natural flavor." The ingredient sounds good, particularly in contrast to another common and mysterious ingredient, "artificial flavor." But what exactly does natural flavor mean? When a reader posed the question, I contacted nutritionists and flavorists — yes, that's a profession — to find out.

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