international space station

Updated 7:30 p.m. ET Saturday

The two astronauts that blasted off in the first private space vehicle to take people to the International Space Station are about to return to Earth — by splashing down in the waters around Florida.

This will be the first planned splashdown for space travelers since 1975, although a Russian Soyuz capsule did have to do an emergency lake landing in 1976.

Two NASA astronauts have arrived at the International Space Station, 19 hours after launching from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Saturday. NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken made the trip on a private space vehicle designed, built and launched by SpaceX.

SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule docked with the station at 10:17 a.m. ET while flying over the border of northern China and Mongolia.

Almost 40 years have passed since the last time NASA astronauts blasted off into space on a brand new spaceship.

Now, as NASA looks forward to Wednesday's planned test flight of the SpaceX Crew Dragon with a pair of astronauts on board, some in the spaceflight community have a little bit of déjà vu.

National Weather Service Paducah, via Twitter

Look up tonight and you might see the International Space Station. The National Weather Service in Paducah shared a Tweet with approximate times and degrees, per NASA's Spot the Station data. 

nasa.gov

Good news for astronomy aficionados: NASA’s International Space Station will be visible tonight through Monday.  

The ISS is NASA's micro-gravity laboratory orbiting the earth every 90 minutes at a speed of five miles-per-second and is only slightly larger than a football field, but weather permitting, will be flying low enough in its orbital pattern to be visible for a short time.