journalism

F. Brian Ferguson

  It wasn’t too long ago that Michael Farmer, a pastor in Charleston, West Virginia, received an email asking him a question that was already on his mind: “As a Black Southern Baptist pastor in West Virginia, what is my role in telling our stories?”

 

The email was from Ashton Marra, the managing digital editor of a news organization called 100 Days in Appalachia. Marra was inviting Farmer to be a part of a new project, the Appalachian Advisors Network. 

 

Hoptown Chronicle, Facebook

Longtime Hopkinsville journalist Jennifer Brown says since she left the Kentucky New Era in 2016 she had been looking for “the next thing” while doing some freelancing and teaching at conferences. She noticed activity and renewed interest in the city’s downtown area. “And I thought that having a news project that had a very hyper local focus on downtown Hopkinsville would be manageable for one person to start.” 

The Denver Post isn't the only newspaper to be bought by a hedge fund that then orders layoffs, shrinking the newsroom to a shell of its former self within a few years.

But it wrote a new page of its history when it fought back in its Sunday edition, with an editorial and a package of opinion pieces around one central idea: Its owners are bleeding the Post, and Coloradans are going to miss it if it dies.

Walmart has removed a controversial T-shirt with a simple message — "Rope. Tree. Journalist. SOME ASSEMBLY REQUIRED" — from its website, after the Radio Television Digital News Association sent the largest retailer in the U.S. a note flagging the shirt's message.

As RTDNA said, the shirt was being sold by Walmart with a company called Teespring acting as a third-party seller. The retailer removed the shirt within one day of being notified.

Abanathy Photography, LLC. cropped

Seven public media stations in Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia, led by Louisville Public Media, have been awarded a $445,000 grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) to establish an Ohio River regional journalism collaboration. 

Courtesy of Jennifer Brown, Kentucky New Era archives

Ted Poston was born in Hopkinsville in 1906. He attended an African American high school in Hopkinsville and earned his bachelor's degree in Nashville. In 1928, he moved to New York and joined the Harlem Renaissance. There, he became the first African American writer on staff at the New York Post and the first to make a career at a white mainstream paper, where he covered the major events of the Civil Rights Era. Kentucky New Era Opinion Editor Jennifer Brown joins Kate Lochte on Sounds Good to preview her "Ted Talk" coming up in March, with more about Hopkinsville's own, the "Dean of Black Journalists," Ted Poston.

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

So, how did the Super Bowl ads score? On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte gets an analysis from a Murray State Executive in Residence, Robert Norsworthy, a national advertising expert formerly of Omnicom Group, working in the Department of Journalism and Mass Communications. Norsworthy picks some of his favorites and gives some insight into how ads are produced for the Super Bowl.

KY Journalism Hall of Fame: "Doc" McGaughey Reflects on Teaching, Radio

Aug 27, 2012

Earlier this year, the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame inducted three west Kentuckians to the ranks of other great Kentucky Journalists: D.J. Everett of WKDZ/WHVO radio in Cadiz, Chip Hutcheson, publisher of The Times Leader and Murray State University professor emeritus Dr. Robert McGaughey. Today we begin a series of conversations with these gentlemen, today we hear from Dr. Robert Mcgaughey better known as “Doc.” Doc retired in 1997 after 30 years with the Journalism and Mass Communications department, 23 years of which he spent as department chair. He taught part time at Murray State until 2010.