Lexington Herald-Leader

Blogtrepreneur / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Federal prosecutors are seeking prison time for Kentucky’s former Democratic Party chief when he is sentenced this week, but attorneys for Jerry Lundergan are seeking probation.

Blogtrepreneur / WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

A lawsuit filed by public defenders in Kentucky says people are being left in jail longer than they're supposed to for technical parole violations during the coronavirus pandemic.

McClatchy / via Facebook

The second-largest local newspaper company in the country, McClatchy, which owns the Lexington Herald-Leader, announced on Thursday it will restructure under Chapter 11 bankruptcy, but one media expert in Kentucky says the bankruptcy shouldn’t worry the state’s second-biggest newspaper.

Wikimedia Commons

  A Kentucky judge says the University of Kentucky shouldn't have withheld documents about a failed business deal from the Lexington Herald-Leader.

Peter Baniak

Several windows were shattered at a Kentucky newspaper office, and police are investigating whether the damage was caused by gunfire.

kentucky.com, via WEKU

The disagreement between Lexington’s city council and the city’s daily newspaper over the distribution of unsolicited publications could end up in court. 

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McCracken’s County’s Judge Executive has expressed his support for the county school district’s busing of private school students.

According to a Lexington Herald Leader article, state financial records show that Kentucky spent nearly $18 million to pay for busing at private, mostly religious schools, in two dozen counties over the last six years. 

A state judge has fined the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services more than $750,000 dollars because it "willfully circumvented" open-records law by not fully releasing records of child abuse fatalities and near deaths.

Franklin Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd ruled Monday that the cabinet made a "mockery" of the Open Records Act by maintaining that documents remain confidential. Shepherd ordered the cabinet to pay the plaintiff's attorney fees and costs to be decided.