Psychology

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Thanksgiving is typically a time when family members come together around the table and enjoy a nice meal, but sometimes the conversations can get heated or become difficult. On Sounds Good, Tracy Ross and Dr. Michael Bordieri of Murray State University's Department of Psychology discuss some helpful tips for getting along better with relatives and being more effective in making interactions positive.

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Mindfulness is an emerging area in psychology with the potential to be useful in our everyday lives, says Dr. Michael Bordieri of Murray State's Department of Psychology. It's not a new psychological discovery, but has been a part of spiritual practices of Buddhism and eastern religion traditions for a millennia. Within the past 30 years or so, western medicine and psychology has taken interested in the practice of mindfulness as a way of paying attention to one's thoughts. On Sounds Good, Tracy Ross speaks with Dr. Bordieri about understanding mindfulness and ways to practice it in everyday life.

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As we approach Halloween, we might be also exposing ourselves to phobias, like Arachnophobia, the fear of spiders. Since the upcoming holiday is a time to be scary and spooky, Tracy Ross speaks with Dr. Michael Bordieri of the Murray State Department of Psychology about phobias and fear through the lens of psychotherapy.

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The majority of people who go to see a mental health professional end up saying they feel better afterwards, which is great news, so then does it even matter which techniques are being used if anything will help? This is an argument that pops up in psychology circles where some believe technique doesn't matter and therapists should just do what they feel is right, says Dr. Michael Bordieri of the Murray State Psychology Department. On Sounds Good, Tracy Ross speaks with Dr. Bordieri on why he disagrees with this approach and gives some examples of psychological treatments that have led to harmful results.

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The fit between the client and the therapist is really important, but finding a the right therapist doesn't have a clear answer because there is a lot of information to weigh, says Dr. Michael Bordieri, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Murray State University. On Sounds Good, Tracy Ross speaks with Dr. Bordieri about ways to find a therapist you're comfortable talking to and willing to be honest with about what you're experiencing.

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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is unfortunately a common condition, says Dr. Michael Bordieri of Murray State University's Psychology Department. Roughly 6.8% of people have or meet the criteria for PTSD, he says, with this number being greater among men and women in uniform. On Sounds Good, he speaks with Kate Lochte about what we know about the symptoms and some of the common treatments for helping people suffering from trauma.

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The public speaking joke goes: some people would rather be in the casket than give the eulogy at a funeral. Public speaking and being around others can be anxiety provoking situations, says Dr. Michael Bordieri, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Murray State University. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Dr. Bordieri on understanding and strategies for overcoming social anxiety.

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Murray Neurologist Dr. Christopher King of Primary Care Medical Center was surprised at the large turnout at a community education meeting about memory loss back in May. He finds that the anxiety about memory loss and dementia leads to a feeling of isolation. He believes that early detection is important and there are resources that exist to help. On Sounds Good, Kate Lochte speaks with Dr. King about his concerns.

Ways to Move Beyond Worry and Anxiety

Jul 14, 2015
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Worry is something we all deal with to some degree and in some forms it can be a healthy way to plan out our days or consider what's going on in the world. But upwards to nine million Americans suffer from it as a disorder - generalized anxiety disorder - where it can take over ones life, says Dr. Michael Bordieri, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Murray State University. He speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about some treatments that might help us move past disruptive levels of worry and anxiety.

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Worry is a normal part of our everyday lives, but it can also be an incredibly detrimental process that takes people out of the day to day and into living in their own heads and not engaging with the world, says Dr. Michael Bordieri. He speaks with Kate Lochte on Sounds Good about worry and anxiety and how this can prevent us from living the life we want.

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