Republican National Committee

After President Trump lost the election to Joe Biden, the campaign's emails and texts to supporters carried on, urgently pushing them to donate money — a strategy that seems to have paid off.

The Trump campaign, the Republican National Committee, affiliated fundraising committees and a new political action committee called Save America have together raised $207.5 million since the election, according to the campaign.

In the two weeks since it became clear that President Trump lost the election to Joe Biden — a period bookended by befuddling press conferences from his longtime lawyer, Rudy Giuliani — the president has made it clear that he will spend his remaining days in the White House in the same way he spent much of his term in office: fighting.

A major political donor, who just two years ago was forced out of his position as finance chair of the Republican National Committee, has contributed millions of dollars this election cycle to Republican candidates and political action committees aligned with the party.

The Biden campaign announced it raised $383 million in September, along with the Democratic National Committee and joint fundraising efforts. The haul is a record-breaking one-month sum, topping its August record of $364.5 million. That puts its two-month total at nearly three-quarters-of-a-billion dollars.

In a tweeted video, former Vice President Joe Biden said the donations came from 5.5 million donors with an average contribution of about $44. "I'm really humbled by it," Biden said.

Updated at 2:45 p.m. ET

Nearly a week after Joe Biden's campaign and the Democratic Party announced they had raised a blockbuster $364 million in August, the Trump campaign and Republican Party still haven't released their numbers, and President Trump is talking about putting in his own money.

The 2020 general election has begun with North Carolina becoming the first state to start mailing out absentee ballots on Friday, two months before Election Day.

Other states will begin doing the same over the next few weeks in an election that's expected to break all records in the number of ballots cast early and by mail. Minnesota will be the first state to offer early in-person voting starting Sept. 18, with many states following not long afterward.

Update: 2:04 p.m. ET

A late-night tweet from Kanye West this week strengthened the impression that establishment Republicans are helping the musician and fashion designer in his quest to get on the ballot in some states as a third-party candidate for president.

"I'm willing to do a live interview with the New York Time[s] about my meeting with Jared where we discussed Dr. Claude Anderson's book Powernomics," the post reads.

Updated at 6:38 p.m. ET

President Trump on Wednesday escalated his rhetorical campaign against an expansion of mail-in voting amid the coronavirus pandemic by threatening federal funding to two states with Democratic governors.

Trump appeared to be set off by an announcement Tuesday from Michigan's Democratic secretary of state, Jocelyn Benson, who said her office will mail an absentee ballot application to every voter in the state for August and November elections.