social media

Geralt / pixabay.com

Modern society is connected by online social media platforms comprised of hundreds of thousands of visual, aural, and textual publications. As more online users begin to publish greater amounts of content, laws regarding individuals' rights to their own image, sound, and likeness gain greater pertinence within the modern era. 

Montgomery County Sheriff's Department / via Facebook

Police are investigating an alleged threat of violence towards a high school in north Tennessee.

Geralt / www.pixabay.com

Social media has transformed in the last twenty years from a personal networking platform to an extension of many businesses, ranging from small companies to international corporations. As more professional institutions incorporate social media in their business strategies, the question of how to regulate social media usage becomes increasingly important. MSU professor, Dr. Kevin Qualls, visits Sounds Good to discuss his new course over this trend, "Media Law Essentials for Business Leaders."

Screen time is often considered the enemy when it comes to teaching kids to be active and well-behaved. But should all forms of media be considered equal?

Research being presented Tuesday finds that for 9- and 10-year-old children taking part in a study of brain development, greater social media use, such as scrolling through Instagram and texting, was associated with some positive effects, including increased physical activity, less family conflict and fewer sleep problems.

"A lie can travel half way around the world while the truth is putting on its shoes."

Mark Twain said that. Actually, it was Winston Churchill. Oh, wait! He didn't say it either. But you can find fairly credible looking sources that attribute those words to one of those two famous men.

Whoever said it, a study on how news travels on Twitter confirms the basic truth of the quote. But on Twitter, lies spread a lot faster.

CJ Marple wanted to teach his young students how quickly information can spread on the Internet.

So earlier this year, the third-grade science teacher wrote up a tweet with the help of his students, asking for other users to retweet the message, or even reply to the message with their location.

Facebook is doing some soul-searching.

In a new commentary, the social media giant acknowledges the possibility that social media can have negative ramifications for democracy. This comes after repeated criticism that it didn't do enough to prevent the spread of fake news that had the potential to impact the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RAY SUAREZ, HOST:

Facebook, Google and Twitter head to Washington this week for their first public congressional hearings on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential campaign via their social networks. In the runup, NPR is exploring the growing social media landscape, the spread of false information and the tech companies that build the platforms in our series: Tech Titans, Bots and the Information Complex.

J. Tyler Franklin / WFPL

The ACLU of Kentucky is suing Gov. Matt Bevin for blocking people on Facebook and Twitter, saying the governor is violating the free speech rights of his constituents.

Pages