U.S. Senator Rand Paul

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U.S. Sen. Rand Paul’s presidential campaign has provided the required funding for a Kentucky Republican presidential caucus in 2016.

Rand Paul / paul.senate.gov

  The Republican Party of Kentucky’s central committee on Saturday approved a plan to hold a presidential caucus next year instead of a primary election, allowing Sen. Rand Paul to run for president and re-election to the U.S. Senate simultaneously in the state.

WKMS/John Null

 

In about a week, Kentucky Republicans will decide the fate of Sen. Rand Paul’s plan to simultaneously run for president and the U.S. Senate next year.

The state party’s central committee — which is made up of more than 300 Republicans from across the state — will vote on whether to approve a presidential caucus slated for March 5, 2016, a Saturday.

In interviews this week with roughly 30 Republican county chairs and vice chairs, WFPL News found mixed opinions on the presidential caucus idea.

Gage Skidmore, Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA 2.0

The state’s Republican Party leaders will vote in about two weeks on plans to hold a caucus instead of a presidential primary next year. 

The caucus is aimed at allowing Senator Rand Paul to run for both president and his senate seat simultaneously. 

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Ahead of Thursday night's Republican presidential debate, a top ally to U.S. Senator Rand Paul has announced he’s taking a leave of absence from Paul's super PAC. 

Jesse Benton, who headed America's Liberty, is under federal indictment for his alleged role in a bribery scheme. 

Rand Paul / paul.senate.gov

  Presidential candidate and Republican U.S. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky made a stop in the Russell Neighborhood in West Louisville Monday.

This story is part of NPR's series Journey Home. We're going to the places presidential candidates call home and finding out what those places tell us about how they see the world.

Sen. Rand Paul made headlines recently with his one-man effort to roll back government surveillance. And that's the just beginning of Paul's plan to dismantle big chunks of the federal government.

Updated at 11:20 a.m. ET

Protesting the soon-to-expire Patriot Act, presidential candidate Sen. Rand Paul held the floor of the Senate for nearly 11 hours late Wednesday in a filibuster-like speech railing against the law and the government's continued surveillance of Americans' phone records.

"I don't think we're any safer looking at every American's records," Paul said.

ASHLEY LOPEZ, WFPL

An analysis of fundraising data from the beginning weeks of Rand Paul’s presidential campaign shows he has strong support from donors in small towns.

The New York Times reports the Bowling Green Republican took in $1 million online in less than 30 hours after formerly launching his campaign April 7.

Flickr Commons- Zach Copley.

 

Rand Paul’s presidential campaign will be the first to accept political contributions in Bitcoin, a relatively new—and completely unregulated—type of digital currency.

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