News and Music Discovery
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Crews will be continuing work on our WKMT transmitter tower in Water Valley over the weekend. 89.5 FM will be off the air starting at 9am each of those days. We're sorry for the disruption. The WKMS main signal and other signals will not be affected.

Tornado survivors invited to recovery resource fair in Madisonville this weekend

Damage is visible from a tornado in Dawson Springs, Kentucky.
Jeff Dean
/
NPR
Damage is visible from a tornado in Dawson Springs, Kentucky.

A disaster recovery resource fair will be held in Hopkins County this weekend to help survivors of the tornado that ripped through west and central Kentucky nearly six months ago.

The Community Foundation of West Kentucky is hosting the Hopkins County Disaster Recovery Resource Fair at the Hopkins County Career and Technology Center in Madisonville this Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. There will be a variety of groups there to help those impacted by the tornado with things such as housing, insurance and loans.

One of the groups that will be there is the Kentucky Housing Corporation. Joe Prichard, managing director of multi-family asset compliance, said the event will have resources from the the federal, state and local levels.

“It'll be a good resource for anybody displaced, especially about the tornadoes from last December, to come and get answers if they're having trouble knowing what to do next,” Prichard said. “This fair will be the place they need to go.”

FLR Disaster Recovery Resource Fair Set for June 4 in Hopkins County - FINAL
Community Foundation of West Kentucky
/
Hopkins County Disaster Recovery Resource Fair Flyer

Other groups participating include the Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs, the Kentucky Public Protection Cabinet, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, local economic development groups, local Habitat for Humanity chapters, housing authorities, Catholic Charities, and more.

The event is free, so attendees aren’t required to bring anything with them.

“It's an information gathering event, so if someone has specific questions, they'll be able to get that contact person they need right there and then they can follow up later if needed,” Prichard said. “They should be able to leave with the information they need for the next steps in rebuilding their lives.”

Spanish and ASL interpreters will be available if needed.

Lily Burris is a tornado recovery reporter for WKMS, Murray State's NPR Station. Her nine month reporting project is supported by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.
Related Content