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Dozens of adults with disabilities in Owensboro may be displaced when housing shuts down April 9

Kentucky's Supports for Community Living program for adults with intellectual disabilities includes a wide range of activities to encourage social skills, such as learning to play the ukulele.
Jill Thompson
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Kentucky's Supports for Community Living program for adults with intellectual disabilities includes a wide range of activities to encourage social skills, such as learning to play the ukulele.

Sixty adults with intellectual disabilities who live in single-family homes in the Owensboro region may be displaced when a housing company affiliated with a state program closes down April 9.

Supports for Community Living is part of the state Medicaid program that works with a variety of companies to provide supervised housing, life skills and job training for people with disabilities.

Jill Thompson coordinates day training in social and workplace skills at To the Max Behavior Therapy in Owensboro.

Thompson currently works with 29 clients in the state Supports for Community Living program. She said those who are likely to be displaced have been living in single-family homes, three people to a house, with staff supervision.

“Some of these people could be placed in nursing homes or institutions. It’s now last option, instead of best option.”
Jill Thompson, To the Max Behavior Therapy

Thompson said the imminent closing of their residences has created a crisis for these Owensboro residents with disabilities. They may have to move to other areas or other states, and start over with getting support services, which may not be equal to the range of services they get in Owensboro.

“Some of these people could be placed in nursing homes or institutions,” said Thompson. “It’s now last option, instead of best option.”

She said each client has a training team, and those teams are seeking an alternate housing option approved under Kentucky’s Supports for Community Living guidelines.

That option is Family Home Providers, called FHPs, which is similar to foster care, but for adults and with many support services.

“Our short-term solution is to try to get more FHPs for our clients and it’s also more personal for them,” said Thompson. She said many area residents are not

aware that they can become a Family Home Provider, which has training, a stipend and support services.

Thompson said neither the name of residential housing company, nor the reason for closing the residences, has been disclosed.

Rhonda Miller began as reporter and host for All Things Considered on WKU Public Radio in 2015. She has worked as Gulf Coast reporter for Mississippi Public Broadcasting, where she won Associated Press, Edward R. Murrow and Green Eyeshade awards for stories on dead sea turtles, health and legal issues arising from the 2010 BP oil spill and homeless veterans.
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