coal mining

Jesse Wright / WVPB

Federal prosecutors on Tuesday said they will seek a court ruling to hold West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice and his son, Jay Justice, personally accountable for a $1.23 million civil fine imposed on one of the family’s coal businesses, Justice Energy Company, Inc.

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Kentucky authorities say a coal miner has died from injuries suffered last week at a mine in southeastern Kentucky.

Vivan Stockman and Southwings

Residents of Appalachian coal communities told a Congressional subcommittee Tuesday that the controversial mining practice known as mountaintop removal should be halted until its health effects are better studied.

Courtesy CVI

A congressional subcommittee will hear testimony Thursday in support of a bill that would help clean up and redevelop surface mine land. The bill enjoys bipartisan support, but still faces hurdles.

Jan Truter / Flickr (Creative Commons License)

The U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration says coal-mining related deaths have reached a record low in Kentucky where a single miner died last year.

The Lexington Herald-Leader reports the agency said Tuesday that there were 12 deaths at coal mines nationwide in 2018. Federal records and investigators say 29-year-old Hubert Grubbs Jr. died in March when he was caught in an underground conveyor belt at a mine near Cumberland.

Sydney Boles / Ohio Valley ReSource

With just days left before a Congressional deadline, advocates for black lung treatment are still pushing Kentucky Sen. Mitch McConnell to secure funding for miners’ benefits.

Courtesy of Marcy Tate

Central Appalachia is in the midst of an unprecedented epidemic of black lung disease, an illness that afflicts coal miners. There is no cure for black lung and, until recently, treatment options were limited. But, one coal miner’s daughter is showing that there may be some hope for relief.

Sydney Boles / Ohio Valley ReSource

A growing body of research shows that people living near mountaintop removal coal mines face increased risks of disease linked to pollutants in air and water. A new report from a human rights group argues that the mining industry has tried to suppress the science about health risks and has forced coalfield communities to take on the industry’s costs. Residents are hoping for clear answers and clean water.

Fifty years ago this week, 78 men were killed when a coal mine exploded in West Virginia. The Farmington Mine Disaster devastated a small town and ushered in new health and safety laws nationwide.

George Butt was in the first grade in November 1968 when his father put in his two weeks' notice at the No. 9 mine. Harold Wayne Butt had worked as a coal miner but planned to switch careers, to become a postmaster.

"They came and got me out of class and told me I had to go home," George Butt said. "Ended up finding out the tragedy when I got there."

Courtesy CVI

From solar farms in Virginia to a green energy subdivision in Kentucky, a new report by a group of regional advocacy organizations highlights 20 ready-made projects across the Ohio Valley that could give abandoned mining operations that were never cleaned up a second life, and create new economic opportunity across the region.

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