Kentucky Politics Distilled

Ryland Barton / Kentucky Public Radio

This week we look at the bills that passed this session — many of them late Thursday night. The legislation includes a requirement that public schools prominently display “In God We Trust,” a decrease in the amount you can be compensated for the power your solar panels add to the energy grid, and four abortion-related bills. The bills will now head to the governor’s office.

Liz Schlemmer / WFPL

This week in state politics, teachers descended on Frankfort again to protest a handful of education and pension-related bills. And for the first time in state history, a medical marijuana bill got a vote. Time is running out on this year’s legislative session.

Liz Schlemmer / WFPL

This week in the Kentucky legislature, teachers descended on Frankfort again to protest a bill dealing with their pension system and lawmakers advanced bills to allow people to carry concealed weapons without a permit.

Kentucky Politics Distilled: Election Filing Deadline; More Kim Davis

Feb 1, 2019

This week was the filing deadline for candidates running for governor, attorney general and other statewide offices this year. And a lawsuit involving former Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis continues to roll through the courts system.

Listen to this week’s Kentucky Politics Distilled here:

J. Tyler Franklin / WFPL

Capitol Reporter Ryland Barton has this week's episode of Kentucky Politics Distilled. 

Ryland Barton / Kentucky Public Radio

This week in Kentucky politics, Attorney General Andy Beshear announced he’s running for governor, the state auditor released a report finding a “pervasive lack of accountability” in Kentucky’s courts administration, and a bunch of new laws go into effect this weekend.

J. Tyler Franklin / WFPL

This week in state politics, federal education officials came to Kentucky to talk about ways to make schools safer, and Gov. Matt Bevin said it all comes down to kids’ cell phone use. One of the Republican lawmakers who helped make changes to the state pension system says they’ll pass the bill again if it’s struck down by the courts. And the state’s new education commissioner talked about the potential costs of taking over Louisville’s school system.

BELCHONOCK, 123RF STOCK PHOTO

This week in Kentucky politics, a judge struck down Kentucky’s new pension law, saying legislators broke the law by rushing the bill to passage. 

Ryland Barton, Kentucky Public Radio

This week in Kentucky politics: the lawsuit over the new pension law was argued in court; Kentucky’s new commissioner of education laid out his priorities, which include helping charter schools open up and taking over Louisville’s public school system; and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell continued to express concern about President Trump’s tariffs leading to a full-blown trade war.

Listen to this week’s edition of Kentucky Politics Distilled in the player above.

Cabinet For Health and Family Services/Screenshot, via WFPL

This week in Kentucky politics, Gov. Matt Bevin said he’s partnering with a former Democratic congressman to help people navigate the state’s new Medicaid rules. We found out that lobbyists set a new spending record at the state legislature as lawmakers made changes to the tax code. Plus, a state-funded aluminum mill broke ground in northeastern Kentucky and  Bevin asked for a judge to recuse himself from the lawsuit over the new pension bill.

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