Poor People's Campaign

Ryland Barton / Kentucky Public Radio

More than a dozen protesters smiled and kissed the floor of the Kentucky Capitol after State Police officers let them enter the building Tuesday following weeks of protests.

Ryland Barton / Kentucky Public Radio

The Poor People’s Campaign in Kentucky will be back at the state Capitol July 10, expecting to enter the building in a group after previously being required to go in two at a time

Ryland Barton / Kentucky Public Radio

Attorney General Andy Beshear says Kentucky State Police illegally restricted a poverty group’s access to the state Capitol building during a series of protests last month.

Ryland Barton, Kentucky Public Radio

  This week in Kentucky politics, Kentucky State Troopers shut protesters out of the state Capitol, allowing only two people to enter the building at a time. Attorney General Andy Beshear is suing Walgreens, saying the company helped fuel the opioid epidemic in the state. And a high-powered lobbyist was in federal court as prosecutors try to prove he bribed a former state official to help a client get state contracts.

Steve Pavey, Hope In Focus

Anti-poverty activists say they will continue a campaign of demonstrations and civil disobedience throughout the Ohio Valley despite arrests at some events and being blocked from Kentucky’s capitol building.

Ryland Barton

Anti-poverty protesters were again told they could only enter into the Kentucky Capitol two at a time on Wednesday, after the state police commissioner previously restricted the group’s access to the building earlier in the week.

Ryland Barton

About 100 protesters from an anti-poverty group crowded the entryway to the Kentucky Capitol Monday after state officials restricted the group’s access to the building.

JOEY ALOI via West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A social-justice organization is requesting a copy of a rule mentioned by a police officer when its members were denied group access into Kentucky's Capitol following an outdoor rally.

Thousands of low-wage workers, faith leaders and civil rights advocates are expected to descend on more than 30 state capitals and Washington, D.C. today to relaunch a fight against poverty, war and income inequality that first took root half a century ago.

The original 1968 Poor People's Campaign was a multicultural, multi-faith coalition planned by Martin Luther King. It brought thousands of Americans living in poverty to the national mall to demand better living conditions and higher wages.

JOEY ALOI via West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A national campaign that aims to unite disenfranchised populations across the U.S. held events in Kentucky and West Virginia late last week.  Meetings are part of a two-month tour designed to highlight social inequity, and build on a movement begun 50 years ago by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.