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Time Frame Unclear for Kentucky Lake Ferry

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Almost a month after a cargo ship collision brought down part of the Eggner’s Ferry Bridge, area residents are still waiting to see what will be done to restore the crossing.  State officials are considering a ferry service to move traffic across Kentucky Lake. Marshall County Judge-Executive Mike Miller tells The Paducah Sun he’s been in constant contact with the Department of Highways, and he has no word yet on a plan, with or without a ferry, to restore traffic.  Miller says one issue with a ferry service is finding areas on each side of the lake with water deep enough to allow a boat’s approach. 

Lee Roberts, public affairs specialist for the Army Corps of Engineers, said any work on ferry landings, including adding fill dirt to the lake for a landing, would require corps approval. The corps issues permits for lake construction projects based on the federal Clean Air and Water Act. So far, no applications for permits for ferry projects have been received.

Miller says the Tennessee Valley Authority, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Coast Guard are collaborating on solutions.  K-Y-T-C spokesman Keith Todd says Governor Steve Beshear assured him the state is working on a time frame of weeks, not months, for the ferry.

Todd Hatton hails from Paducah, Kentucky, where he got into radio under the auspices of the late, great John Stewart of WKYX while a student at Paducah Community College. He also worked at WKMS in the reel-to-reel tape days of the early 1990s before running off first to San Francisco, then Orlando in search of something to do when he grew up. He received his MFA in Creative Writing at Murray State University. He vigorously resists adulthood and watches his wife, Angela Hatton, save the world one plastic bottle at a time.
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