Kellyanne Conway

Donald Trump's campaign manager, Bill Stepien is the latest in the president's inner circle to test positive for the coronavirus, a campaign official confirmed to NPR.

Updated at 2:47 p.m. ET

Even before the Republican National Convention began, government ethics experts warned that hosting campaign events from the White House South Lawn and the Rose Garden could violate federal ethics law.

But in the convention's first two days, Trump has gone even further — wielding the powers of his office and the federal government to promote his reelection campaign.

Updated at 8:30 a.m. ET

Senior White House adviser Kellyanne Conway has announced that she will step down from her post at the end of the month.

Conway, whose official title is counselor to the president, is known for her tenacious defense of administration policy in frequent appearances on cable television. She is one of President Trump's longest-serving aides.

In a statement on Sunday, she cited a need to "devote more time to family matters."

President Trump met with Republican congressional leaders Sen. Mitch McConnell and Rep. Kevin McCarthy on Monday to discuss the next round of coronavirus relief funding, saying he hoped the next package would help small businesses.

Trump also said he would revive his daily 5 p.m. coronavirus briefings, likely starting Tuesday, noting the need to get out information with the surge in cases. "We have had this big flare-up in Florida, Texas, a couple of other places," he said.

A reporter in West Virginia was arrested and charged with a crime Tuesday after he repeatedly attempted to question Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price.

Price was walking through a hallway in the state Capitol, which he was visiting with Trump adviser Kellyanne Conway as part of a "listening tour" on the opioid crisis. Several protesters were gathered in the hallway, as was Dan Heyman, a reporter for the Public News Service.

CITY OF BOWLING GREEN

The mayor of Bowling Green says he doesn’t think recent comments about a so-called “massacre” in the city will harm its reputation.

Gage Skidmore, Flickr Commons (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Update: Conway said on Twitter she misspoke when she said "massacre" and meant to say "terrorists." FactCheck.org explains what happened in Bowling Green in 2011.

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