Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Some city streets have undergone a remarkable transformation during this pandemic. They've become walkways or bike paths. As NPR's Camila Domonoske reports, some of these changes could stick.

Unemployment is mounting. The economy keeps falling deeper into a recession — or worse. The coronavirus continues to spread. But car sales surprisingly are climbing.

If you're still waiting for your pandemic payment from the federal government, and you would like to receive it directly into your bank account, head over to the IRS website by noon on Wednesday.

If the IRS doesn't have your direct deposit information by that deadline, you'll still get your payment — but you'll receive it in the form of a paper check, which might not arrive until June.

Electric carmaker Tesla has resumed production at its Fremont, Calif., plant — in defiance of local health authorities.

Michelle Lee, a cashier at a Safeway in Alexandria, Va., has kept working through the pandemic. In fact, she has been working harder than ever.

"My back is hurting a little bit, but I'm doing all right," she told NPR in March. "It's been really, really busy. The lines are really long. Customers are buying $200, $300, $400 worth of groceries. And it's constant. It's nonstop."

America is starting its engines again.

Freeways and city streets have been remarkably empty for weeks. The coronavirus pandemic caused an unprecedented drop in U.S. traffic — total miles driven dropped by more than 40% in the last two weeks of March, according to data collected by Arity.

In some states, mileage eventually dropped more than 60% below what would be expected without a pandemic.

But for several weeks now, the same data shows that miles driven are starting to climb again. Driving remains well below normal levels, but is rising consistently.

Updated at 9:45 a.m. ET on Tuesday

Cars didn't change much between March and May. But the factories where they're assembled are shifting dramatically.

Courtney Meadows, a cashier at a Kroger in Beckley, W.Va., knows her job carries new risks these days, but she also sees the positive side of life as an essential worker.

"It might sound silly for some, but for me, I'm grateful that I can still get up and go to work," Meadows says. "I'm one of these people ... I probably will go stir-crazy if I had to stay home."

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Updated at 4:53 p.m. ET

The dramatic collapse in worldwide demand for oil led to an extraordinary development on Monday: U.S. oil prices fell below zero for the first time ever, and kept falling.

The key U.S. oil benchmark, West Texas Intermediate, settled at negative $37.63.

Driven by a trading contract deadline, traders desperately looked for buyers for the barrels of oil they normally hold in their books. But buyers were hard to find — even when the oil was being given away for free.

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