National Institutes of Health

A massive computer breach allowed hackers to spend months exploring numerous U.S. government networks and private companies' systems around the world. Industry experts say a country mounted the complex hack — and government officials say Russia is responsible.

The hackers attached their malware to a software update from SolarWinds, a company based in Austin, Texas. Many federal agencies and thousands of companies worldwide use SolarWinds' Orion software to monitor their computer networks.

More than 11 million confirmed coronavirus cases have been recorded in the United States, according to a COVID-19 tracker by Johns Hopkins University. The country reported 166,555 new cases on Sunday, with 1,266 new deaths.

Americans continue to wait in long lines to get tested for the coronavirus. Many then face frustration and anxiety waiting days — sometimes even weeks — to get their results.

Could technology finally solve the testing woes that have hobbled the nation's ability to fight the pandemic? The National Institutes of Health hopes so.

Dr. Elias Zerhouni knows the dangers of infectious disease outbreaks. He was director of the National Institutes of Health in 2005 when bird flu appeared poised to become more infectious to humans. Fortunately, that pandemic never materialized, but he says it served as a warning of what was to come.

Zerhouni has been a member of the faculty of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and head of global research and development for the pharmaceutical company Sanofi.

Updated at 12:10 p.m. ET

The U.S. could have prevented roughly 36,000 deaths from COVID-19 if broad social distancing measures had been put in place just one week earlier in March, according to an analysis from Columbia University.

Underlining the importance of aggressively responding to the coronavirus, the study found the U.S. could have avoided at least 700,000 fewer infections if actions that began on March 15 had actually started on March 8.

Johnson & Johnson will stop selling talcum-based baby powder in the United States and Canada after being ordered to pay out billions of dollars related to lost legal battles over claims the product causes cancer.

The company made the announcement Tuesday. It denied allegations that the powder is responsible for health problems.

University of Kentucky/Facebook

The University of Kentucky says it has received an $11.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to fund a center to study links between obesity and cancer.

Jacob Ryan/WFPL, cropped

The University of Louisville says researchers at the school have received nearly $8 million from the National Institutes of Health for an alcohol research center.

U.S. Congress

  Kentucky's 1st District U.S. Representative Ed Whitfield says his fellow Republicans have made it known to President Barack Obama and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid that they want to reach a compromise over the federal government shutdown. But Whitfield says the Democrats are trying to win political points.

NIH Small Business Conference to Focus on Healthcare

May 29, 2012
win.niddk.nih.gov

Hundreds of entrepreneurs, researchers and small businesses from across the country will be in Louisville this week for a conference focusing on research into health and life sciences.