Joe Palca

Joe Palca is a science correspondent for NPR. Since joining NPR in 1992, Palca has covered a range of science topics — everything from biomedical research to astronomy. He is currently focused on the eponymous series, "Joe's Big Idea." Stories in the series explore the minds and motivations of scientists and inventors. Palca is also the founder of NPR Scicommers – A science communication collective.

Palca began his journalism career in television in 1982, working as a health producer for the CBS affiliate in Washington, DC. In 1986, he left television for a seven-year stint as a print journalist, first as the Washington news editor for Nature, and then as a senior correspondent for Science Magazine.

In October 2009, Palca took a six-month leave from NPR to become science writer in residence at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

Palca has won numerous awards, including the National Academies Communications Award, the Science-in-Society Award of the National Association of Science Writers, the American Chemical Society's James T. Grady-James H. Stack Award for Interpreting Chemistry for the Public, the American Association for the Advancement of Science Journalism Prize, and the Victor Cohn Prize for Excellence in Medical Writing. In 2019, Palca was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences for outstanding achievement in journalism.

With Flora Lichtman, Palca is the co-author of Annoying: The Science of What Bugs Us (Wiley, 2011).

He comes to journalism from a science background, having received a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California at Santa Cruz, where he worked on human sleep physiology.

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You want to stop the spread of coronavirus? You got to keep health workers safe. That means giving them the protective gear they need, including something called a respirator, which protects someone from breathing in viral particles. NPR science correspondent Joe Palca traveled to the 3M mask manufacturer in Minnesota.

JOE PALCA, BYLINE: At 3M, they've been thinking about how to respond to the coronavirus outbreak for a while.

NIKKI MCCULLOUGH: In mid-January, we started to notice some strange disease patterns coming out of China.

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2020 could be a banner year for the U.S. space program. If all goes well, two commercial companies may be able to send astronauts into space. This country hasn't been able to do that since the shuttle program ended in 2011. Also next year, a new six-wheeled rover is supposed to head off to Mars. And hundreds of small satellites are scheduled to go into orbit. And that will provide global Internet coverage. Here to talk about the year ahead in space is NPR science correspondent Joe Palca. Hey, Joe.

JOE PALCA, BYLINE: Hey, Lulu.

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This next story is about the anchovy and the whale - specifically about why an agile anchovy can't escape from a ponderous whale. NPR science correspondent Joe Palca reports that as with so many things in life, the answer is timing.

JOE PALCA, BYLINE: Whale biologist David Cade, who recently graduated from Stanford University, says there's no question humpback whales enjoy a tasty meal of anchovies, but they're not always successful at getting one.

The Year In Science News

Dec 26, 2019

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All right, astronomers have known about black holes for a long time, but they never had a picture of one until this year. We asked NPR science correspondent Joe Palca what were the three biggest science stories of the year, and here's what he said.

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There are rare chemical elements, and then there is tennessine. Only a couple dozen atoms of the stuff have ever existed. For the 150th anniversary of the periodic table, NPR science correspondent Joe Palca has the convoluted story of one of the latest elements to be added.

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