Psychology

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Memories of our own transitions to new schools, new teachers, and new environments can stick with us into adulthood, but it can still be difficult to help children and teenagers navigate life changes in a healthy way. Murray State professor of psychology, Michael Bordieri, visits Sounds Good to discuss ways to lighten the tension and nerves associated with returning to school. 

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The Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) estimates that nearly 160 million Americans are overweight. Busy schedules, unrealistic diets, and lack of access to healthy food make losing weight seemingly impossible, but mindfulness might be able to help. Michael Bordieri visits Sounds Good to discuss mindful weight loss.

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According to the CDC, 145 million adults now include walking as part of a physically active lifestyle. New research suggests that the location of these walks could be equally important to an individual's health as the exercise itself. Murray State University professor, Michael Bordieri, Ph.D., visits Sounds Good to discuss the best locales for walking. 

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Over the past thirty years, there has been a significant shift in the identification, treatment, and socal stigma of PTSD, or post-traumatic stress disorder. Murray State professor of psychology, Michael Bordieri, Ph.D., visits Sounds Good to discuss this surprisingly common mental health condition.

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Starting with Freudian psychology of the early 20th century, the blame for behavioral issues has often fallen back on the individual exhibiting the problematic symptoms. More recent studies show the environment might be to blame. Murray State professor of psychology, Michael Bordieri, Ph.D., visits Sounds Good to discuss the ABCs of behavioral psychology. 

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Approaching one's mental health can often involve a catalogue of undesirable or harmful symptoms and how to fix them. However, a new psychological outlook focused on resiliencies and strengths of the patients might prove to be more beneficial. Murray State University professor of psychology, Michael Bordieri, Ph.D., visits Sounds Good to discuss this theory. 

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Stress is a common phenomena in today's world. From positive to negative circumstances, many people can feel overwhelmed and pressured to fix problems, accomplish greatness, or a mix of the two. Michael Bordieri, Murray State professor of psychology, visits Sounds Good to discuss how to healthily identify and manage stress.

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Pinching pennies, tightening the purse strings, saving money -- in today's world of instant gratification and financial instability, saving up for the future can prove to be easier said than done for many people. However, it's not impossible. Murray State professor of psychology, Michael Bordieri, Ph.D., visits Sounds Good to discuss the psychology of saving money. 

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An experimental method of health care aimed towards improving social well-being and community connectivity is decreasing the need for more traditional forms of pharmaceutical-based care. Michael Bordieri, Ph.D., Murray State University professor of psychology, visits Sounds Good to discuss the new medicinal trend. 

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Problematic behavior can occur in children and adults alike. Murray State professor of psychology, Michael Bordieri, Ph.D., visits Sounds Good to discuss how to implement positive change in which the behavioral goals expected can be compared to a dead person's (or in this case, teddy bear's) capabilities.

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