Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell

Updated at 4:55 p.m. ET

President Trump says he has ordered his representatives to stop talks with Democrats on a new round of COVID-19 aid until after the election.

Updated at 1:20 p.m. ET

Judge Amy Coney Barrett has tested negative for the coronavirus, a White House spokesman said Friday, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he planned to move forward with her confirmation process, which is set to begin Oct. 12.

States led by officials supportive of abortion rights are preparing for a world without Roe v. Wade. If the 1973 decision that legalized abortion nationwide is overturned by an increasingly conservative Supreme Court, regulation of abortion would fall to state lawmakers.

Lawmakers are weighing in on President Trump's efforts to sow doubt in the legitimacy of the Nov. 3 election and his assertion that mail-in ballots could compromise the timing of results.

With levels of distress predictably split along party lines, Democrats in Washington, D.C., have sounded alarm bells over Trump's refusal to outright agree to peacefully vacate office should he lose the White House race.

House Democrats have released a $2.2 trillion coronavirus response package as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin attempt to revive long-stalled aid negotiations.

Supporters and opponents of Amy Coney Barrett's nomination to the Supreme Court wasted no time launching a high-pitched battle over her confirmation, with just 37 days until the election.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has the support of Republicans to move forward with the confirmation process and confirm Barrett on the Senate floor before Nov. 3, barring any development in her vetting.

Updated at 4:16 p.m. ET

Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, says he will support moving forward with President Trump's upcoming election year nomination to the Supreme Court.

Romney issued a statement Tuesday that he intends "to follow the Constitution and precedent in considering the President's nominee." If the nominee reaches the Senate floor he intends "to vote based upon their qualifications."

Updated at 7:58 p.m. ET

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell reiterated his plans to move forward on President Trump's nominee to fill the vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court left by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

"The Senate will vote on this nomination this year," McConnell, R-Ky., said Monday on the Senate floor. He didn't say whether the vote would come before the election, or in a lame duck-session of Congress that occurs after the November election and before the start of a new session in 2021.

As if 2020 couldn't get any more politically contentious, a fight is underway over a Supreme Court vacancy — just 43 days until Election Day, and as Americans are already voting in some places during this election season.

Raising the stakes even more, this is not just any seat. It's the chair formerly held by Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the liberal and feminist cultural icon.

Official Headshot / Kentucky Attorney General Office

  President Donald Trump has announced 20 people he’d consider to be on the U.S Supreme Court if he has to fill another vacancy, and among them is first-term Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron.

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