Barbara Sprunt

Barbara Sprunt is a producer on NPR's Washington desk, where she reports and produces breaking news and feature political content. She formerly produced the NPR Politics Podcast and got her start in radio at as an intern on NPR's Weekend All Things Considered and Tell Me More with Michel Martin. She is an alumnus of the Paul Miller Reporting Fellowship at the National Press Foundation. She is a graduate of American University in Washington, D.C., and a Pennsylvania native.

Months ago, as the primary season was unfolding, election experts began to sound the alarm on what they saw as a glaring threat to a smooth voting process come fall: a shortage of poll workers.

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and his wife, Jill Biden, joined the nearly 75 million voters who have cast their ballots early.

The former vice president voted at the Carvel State Office Building in his hometown of Wilmington, Del., after delivering remarks about protecting the Affordable Care Act.

After voting, Biden spoke to reporters about his plans on health care, saying he thinks he'll be able to work with Republicans.

The Senate has voted 52-48 to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court, just about a week before Election Day and 30 days after she was nominated by President Trump to fill the seat of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

In a White House ceremony following the vote Monday evening, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas administered the constitutional oath to Coney Barrett.

With less than two weeks until voting concludes, President Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden will face off for the final time in a debate on Thursday, likely marking Trump's last chance to reach a massive audience as he trails Biden in polls nationally and in key states.

Joe Biden's campaign is urging its supporters not to become complacent in the final weeks of the presidential race, even as polling suggests the former vice president remains ahead of President Trump in several key swing states.

"The very searing truth is that Donald Trump can still win this race, and every indication we have shows that this thing is going to come down to the wire," Biden campaign manager Jen O'Malley Dillon wrote in a memo to supporters on Saturday.

Updated at 5:50 p.m. ET

The Biden campaign on Thursday canceled Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris' travel through Sunday after two people traveling with her tested positive for the coronavirus.

The campaign says it learned Wednesday night that Liz Allen — Harris' communications director — and a non-staff flight crew member tested positive for the virus. Both Allen and the crew member were on a flight with Harris on Oct. 8.

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has extended the state's deadline for Floridians to register to vote after the state's registration website crashed due to a heavy volume of traffic.

The new deadline to register is 7 p.m. Tuesday.

In a statement, Florida Secretary of State Laurel Lee said the state's online registration portal experienced "unprecedented volume and traffic" of 1.1 million requests an hour Monday evening.

President Trump, who is still receiving treatment for COVID-19, tweeted Tuesday morning that he is "feeling great" and plans to move forward with the second presidential debate slated for Oct. 15 in Miami.

Over the weekend, it seemed possible that Trump would take on a different tone when talking about the severity of COVID-19 now that he is a patient battling the disease.

Updated at 8:18 p.m. ET

President Trump walked out of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Monday evening, planning on receiving the remainder of his treatment for COVID-19 at the White House.

He was seen pumping his fist in the air on the way out of the building and didn't respond to any questions from the press. Upon arriving back at the White House, Trump walked up the staircase of the South Portico entrance, removed his mask, gave reporters standing below a thumbs-up and saluted Marine One.

Updated at 7:59 p.m. ET

President Trump's hospitalization for COVID-19 casts unprecedented uncertainty on the presidential campaign's final stretch.

There are 30 days until Election Day and millions of votes have already been cast.

Pages