Aaron Payne

Ohio Valley ReSource Reporter

Aaron Payne tackles the related issues of addiction recovery and economic recovery for the ReSource. He is a radio guy who first took to the airwaves at WMUL-FM, the campus voice for Marshall University, where he studied journalism. Aaron was the play-by-play voice of the West Virginia Miners baseball team (and he has the championship ring to prove it). At West Virginia Public Broadcasting he covered the state legislature and a chemical spill that left more than a quarter of a million people without potable water – including him. Aaron has also been a correspondent and director of news and programming for West Virginia MetroNews. In his spare time, Aaron enjoys listening to music, reading a good book, wandering in the outdoors and watching sports of all kinds.

Ways to Connect

Aaron Payne / Ohio Valley ReSource

Meigs County, Ohio, has a complicated history with marijuana.

“Meigs County Gold” has been grown illegally for years. Local legend has it that was the strain of choice for musicians like the Grateful Dead and Willie Nelson when they toured Ohio.

OLEG DUDKO 123RF STOCK PHOTO

The U.S. Department of Justice announced on Wednesday more than a dozen indictments against doctors in the Ohio Valley on charges relating to the illegal distribution of opioids. These are the first major indictments from the Appalachian Regional Prescription Opioid Strike Force, which started work in December.

Aaron Payne | Ohio Valley Resource

Sue Meeks has worked with children for years as a registered nurse.

Meeks manages the family navigator program at Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine in Athens, Ohio.

Several years ago, she started noticing three and four-year-olds coming into the program with certain distinctive behaviors.

Ashton Marra / WVPB

When Dr. Rahul Gupta started work as West Virginia’s chief health officer his state was already ground zero for the opioid epidemic, with some of the nation’s highest rates of addiction and overdose fatalities.

That was 2015, and 735 state residents died from overdoses that year.  

Preliminary data for 2017 show there were 1,011 overdose deaths last year, a record high for the state.

Courtesy of the office of the Surgeon General

In a comprehensive new report on the opioid crisis, the U.S. surgeon general writes that stigma remains a major barrier to treatment and urges a more supportive approach to those in need.

Surgeon General Jerome Adams wrote in his Spotlight on Opioids report that stigma has prevented people with opioid use disorders from seeking treatment.

Mary Meehan / Ohio Valley ReSource

The U.S. Senate has approved a bipartisan package to address the nation’s opioid crisis with more resources for addiction treatment and recovery and an emphasis on stopping the flow of the deadly synthetic opioid fentanyl.

Alexandra Kanik | Ohio Valley ReSource

New data from the 2017 National Survey on Drug Use and Health show a rare bright spot amid the opioid crisis. Fewer high schoolers in the region appear to be using opioids.

Anthony Scott Lockard / KY River Dist. Health

In a room at the Letcher County Health Department in Whitesburg, Kentucky, about 20 people are learning how to use naloxone, the opioid overdose reversal medication.

Bill Ambrose / Your Voice Ohio

An Ohio-based collaborative thinks journalists can play a bigger role in solving the region's opioid crisis. The effort starts with listening to people in some of the hardest-hit communities.

Mary Meehan / Ohio Valley ReSource

Health officials in Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia say the number of overdose deaths related to the opioid crisis continued to rise in 2017 as state data began to reflect the fatalities related to the powerful drug fentanyl.

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