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Gabe Bullard (KPR)

Kentucky Public Radio Correspondent

Journalist Gabe Bullard has been appointed News Director of WFPL, following a national search. WFPL provides local, national and international news to Metro Louisville and is part of the locally owned and operated not-for-profit Louisville Public Media.

“Our challenge was to find a person who possessed equal measures of excellence in journalism and expertise in emerging media, as well as vision, leadership, and a passion to build our local news initiative,” says Todd Mundt, VP and Chief Content Officer of Louisville Public Media. “We realized, as we interviewed candidates from around the country, that WFPL already employed someone with the depth of talent and unique combination of skills to move this news service forward.”

Bullard joined Louisville Public Media (LPM) in 2008 as a reporter covering government and local news. His hiring was part of LPM’s first phase of building a newsroom to meet the evolving needs of our community. It includes a focus on local government, the environment, and arts and humanities, and investment in new technology to accommodate the community’s demand for multiple platforms in news delivery. Along with radio, the Internet and mobile phones have become vital to LPM’s public service.

“At a time when journalism nationwide is in significant decline and the need for quality local news is in increasing demand, Louisville Public Media has made local news coverage the centerpiece of its strategic plan,” explains Donovan Reynolds, President of Louisville Public Media. “Placing Gabe Bullard in a leadership role will enable 89.3 WFPL to deepen and strengthen local news coverage in Metro Louisville and broaden its reach as a trusted, essential news source.”

For more information contact Todd Mundt at tmundt@wfpl.org, or (502) 814-6500 or visit wfpl.org. Read more about the Digital Newsroom Initiative at louisvillepublicmedia.org.

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