Ryland Barton

Kentucky Public Radio State Capitol Reporter

Ryland is the state capitol reporter for Kentucky Public Radio. He's covered politics and state government for NPR member stations KWBU in Waco and KUT in Austin. Always looking to put a face to big issues, Ryland's reporting has taken him to drought-weary towns in West Texas and relocated communities in rural China. He's covered breaking news like the 2014 shooting at Fort Hood Army Base and the aftermath of the fertilizer plant explosion in West, Texas. 

Ryland has a bachelor's degree from the University of Chicago and a master's degree in journalism from the University of Texas. He grew up in Lexington.

Ryland Barton

The sponsors of a Kentucky voter ID bill have made changes to the proposal, no longer strictly requiring a photo ID in order to cast a ballot in elections.

belchonock / 123rf Stock Photo

  Most of the former board of education members ousted by Gov. Andy Beshear are continuing their lawsuit against the new administration, and moving the challenge to a federal court.

Courtesy of Fayette County Public Schools

Off-duty police officers hired to do security at Kentucky public schools would be required to carry guns under a bill sponsored by a top Republican in the state Senate.

Fayette County Public Schools

  Off-duty police officers hired to do security at Kentucky public schools would be required to carry guns under a bill sponsored by a top Republican in the state Senate.

Ryland Barton

  Kentuckians would no longer vote for governor during odd-numbered years under a bill that unanimously passed out of a legislative committee on Wednesday.

Baishampayan Ghose, Creative Commons

A legislative committee has unanimously approved a bill that would legalize sports betting in Kentucky, sending it to be considered by the state House of Representatives.

Kentucky Office of the Attorney General

  Gov. Andy Beshear delivered his first State of the Commonwealth address on Tuesday, urging the state legislature to move beyond partisan disagreements and support his agenda.

One week into Kentucky’s annual legislative session, Beshear called on lawmakers to curb insulin costs, reform the criminal justice system and find new revenue by legalizing sports betting.

Beshear also called on lawmakers to pass a budget that gives teachers a $2,000 per year raise and end cuts to higher education.

Jacob Ryan/WFPL

 

Kentucky abortion rights advocates hope that their lives will be easier with a Democratic governor in office, but they will still have to contend with a strongly anti-abortion legislature.

Tamarri Wieder is the public affairs and policy director for Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky. She says that Gov. Andy Beshear’s defeat of Gov. Matt Bevin last year shows that voters didn’t rally around anti-abortion causes.

“He tried to really use Andy Beshear’s pro-choice stances against him and it failed,” Wieder said.

J. Tyler Franklin, WFPL

Republican leaders in Kentucky’s legislature are rallying around a bill that would ban cities, public agencies and universities from adopting so-called “sanctuary” policies that snub federal immigration officials.

Lisa Gillespie, WFPL

Louisville Democratic state Rep. Charles Booker has filed his paperwork to run for the seat currently held by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

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