Uri Berliner

As Senior Business Editor at NPR, Uri Berliner edits and reports on economics, technology and finance. He provides analysis, context and clarity to breaking news and complex issues.

Berliner helped to build Planet Money, one of the most popular podcasts in the country.

Berliner's work at NPR has been recognized with a Peabody Award, a Loeb Award, Edward R. Murrow Award, a Society of Professional Journalists New America Award, and has been twice honored by the RTDNA. He was the recipient of a Nieman Fellowship at Harvard University. A New Yorker, he was educated at Sarah Lawrence College and Columbia University.

Berliner joined NPR after more than a decade as a print newspaper reporter in California where he covered scams, gangs, military issues, and the border. As a newspaper reporter, his feature writing and investigative reporting earned numerous awards. He started his journalism career at the East Hampton (N.Y) Star.

Beating back the pandemic may come down to simple math: getting enough people vaccinated.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease expert, says the country will likely need a vaccination level of between 70% and 90% to reach herd immunity.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We know there are some Americans who are hesitant to get vaccinated. So there's this idea out there to give them money to encourage them, and it's supported by a number of economists and politicians - essentially, a government cash-for-shots program. But there are those who do say it could backfire. NPR's Uri Berliner has more.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Now let's dig into some new research about something many of us are guilty of - using buzzwords and corporate gobbledygook. NPR's Uri Berliner has a look at why it just won't go away.

URI BERLINER, BYLINE: You've heard these phrases before, maybe more than you ever wanted to.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: There's definitely some synergy here.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #2: That is a win.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #3: That's a win-win.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #2: Let's get our ducks in a row here, guys.

There's a saying going around these days: The future of work is now — put into overdrive by the pandemic that suddenly transformed millions into virtual workers. But the coronavirus has also accelerated a major shift to freelancing that's severing ties between companies and employees.

Two million Americans have started freelancing in the past 12 months, according to a new study from Upwork, a freelance job platform. And that has increased the proportion of the workforce that performs freelance work to 36%.

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There's a saying going around these days - the future of work is now. The pandemic has turned millions of us into virtual workers. And there's another trend that's been less obvious - permanent full-time jobs going freelance. That is severing ties between companies and employees, as NPR's Uri Berliner reports.

URI BERLINER, BYLINE: Diana Gill was having her early morning coffee at her New York apartment when the messages started coming in from the boss's office. Can you get on a call this morning?

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Indefinite. Or even permanent. These are words companies are using about their employees working from home.

It's three months into a huge, unplanned social experiment that suddenly transported the white-collar workplace from cubicles and offices to kitchens and spare bedrooms. And many employers now say the benefits of remote work outweigh the drawbacks.

In normal times, hotels promote their star chefs or their swanky design upgrades. But priorities have changed. In the age of the coronavirus, the news from Hilton is a partnership — with Lysol.

As hotel guests begin to return, the standard expectation of hygiene has been elevated to "where it's cleanliness almost with a double exclamation point after it," says Phil Cordell, Hilton's global head of brand development.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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