Ravenna Koenig

Ravenna Koenig is a producer and director for Weekend Edition. Before joining the show, she interned at WNYC's On The Media and Benjamen Walker's Theory of Everything podcast. Since joining Weekend Edition in 2014, she has produced interviews with a diverse range of guests including Charli XCX, Mark Morris, Brie Larson, Ibeyi, and Sandra Cisneros. Her reported work has also been featured on NPR, with a focus on arts and culture. During the 2016 presidential cycle, Ravenna has field-produced stories on the election and was part of a team that produced Morning Edition's documentary special about how Americans see President Obama's time in office. Her hometown is an island near Seattle, and while she doesn't miss the rain, she does miss the feeling of wonder after 30 straight days of it.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In the northernmost town in the United States, the sun stops appearing above the horizon in November and doesn't make it back up until January.

That first sunrise of the new year is the pivot-point on which winter turns and begins to move toward spring, delivering people on the northern Arctic coast of Alaska from the long spell of darkness.

When the sun comes up in Utqiaġvik, it makes a dramatic entrance: a thumbnail of neon pink inching above the horizon. And people are so, so glad to see it.

People who live in the town of Utqiaġvik have seen dramatic effects of climate change during their lifetimes.

Utqiaġvik, formerly known as Barrow, sits right on the edge of the Arctic Ocean at the very top of Alaska. It's the northernmost town in the United States, and home to about 4,400. The coastline here used to be edged with sea ice for nearly the whole year. But that period is getting shorter and shorter, and as a result Utqiaġvik locals are dealing with coastal erosion and are changing how they hunt in the fall.

A milestone oil development project in Alaska's Arctic waters is having to extend its construction timeline to accommodate the warming climate. The recently approved Liberty Project — poised to become the first oil production facility in federal Arctic waters — has altered its plans due to the shrinking sea ice season.

Golf's oldest major championship has a 2017 winner: Jordan Spieth, an American.

A dramatic final round capped the tournament, with Spieth vying with fellow American Matt Kuchar for the top position. China's Li Haotong finished six strokes back in third place.

Spieth, 23, started the day with a three-shot lead over Kuchar, but temporarily lost it after a shaky performance for the first 13 holes, including an almost catastrophic drive on the 13th that required him to take an unplayable and drop between sponsorship trucks.

Mary Matsuda Gruenewald grew up on Vashon Island in Washington State. It's a small town of about 10,000 people — many of whom commute by ferry to jobs in nearby Seattle. It's green, it's beautiful, it's the kind of place where you can't walk into the grocery store without seeing someone you know.

Mary Matsuda Gruenewald says that when she lived there, a lot of the families were farming families, including hers. Her high school experience was pretty typical, until one Sunday in 1941.