Mental health

Federal Data Shows Scope Of Substance Abuse, Mental Illness

Sep 14, 2018
Karel Miragaya / 123rf Stock photo

The federal government released today a report on substance abuse and mental illness across the country. Dr. Elinor McCance-Katz leads the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. She said there are some positive changes.

Workandapix / Pixabay, Public Domain

New research from a local student-led mental health group paints a complicated picture of mental health perceptions of Kentucky students.

Terry Little / Courtesy of Playhouse In The Park

A local theater is hopeful a community conversation about mental illness will continue now that their performance of a show exploring that topic has closed.

Tumisu / Pixabay, Public Domain

It's estimated that almost half of all Americans have or will have, at some point in their life, suffered from symptoms related to mental illnesses. Dr. Michael Bordieri visits Sounds Good to discuss ways in which we can move away from the stigma that has traditionally surrounded mental health. 

Matt Markgraf, WKMS

  Paducah elementary schools have implemented a new program that aims to raise children’s self-esteem and benefit their mental and emotional health.

Nicole Erwin, WKMS

In the wake of the January shooting at Marshall County High School, Kentucky lawmakers have advanced a bill that would require schools to employ mental health professionals to recognize symptoms of trauma in students.

A growing shortage of psychiatrists across the U.S. is making it harder for people who struggle with mental illness to get the care they need — and the lack of federal funding for mental health services may be to blame.

Eric E Castro/Flickr

  Tracy Ross and MSU Assistant Professor of Psychology, Dr. Michael Bordieri, continue their biweekly discussions on Sounds Good with an examination of the meaning of happiness. Together, they explore the psychology behind what it means to be happy and how you might improve upon and increase your own happiness. 

Alexander Korzh, 123RF Stock Photo

Eastern Kentucky residents have access to more mental health providers than the rest of the state, but proportionately, there are fewer primary physicians in the Appalachian region.

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